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Stewardship Sermons (Proverbs)


Sermons (Proverbs 3)
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    Success God’s Way: Part 2
    Adrian Rogers. Getting on Top of Your Finances series, no. 3. Sermon, n.d.
    The question most frequently asked of any pastor is how to know the will of God, or how to be a success. Though God has a specific, individual plan for each life, finding that plan often seems difficult. Pastor Adrian Rogers notes from Proverbs 3:5-6 that the success God sends will be marked by several characteristics: (1) Dependence: We must exhibit complete reliance upon God, a dependence that leads, in turn, to compliance to His commands. Since we trust a Person who is able both to provide and protect, we need have no fear in trusting and obeying Him. (2) Direction: If we trust, lean on and acknowledge God, we can be certain that God will lead us. The will of God for our lives, found in His Scriptures, is that we will be saved, filled with the Spirit and sanctified. He provides His word, prayer, commonsense wisdom and providence in order to direct us in our everyday lives. (3) Dynamism: God actively will make our paths straight. (4) Demolition of obstacles: God not only shows the way, but He clears the way as well, providing both the knowledge and the power to follow His path. Thus, true success comes to the heart that seeks after God. This resource is available on compact disc.

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Sermons (Proverbs 10)
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    Scattering Gathers, Gathering Scatters
    Timothy Keller. “Proverbs: True Wisdom for Living” sermon series, no. 8. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, October 31, 2004.
    Pastor Timothy Keller utilizes the paradox of money found in selected verses from Proverbs (chapters 10, 11, 13 and 30) to expound the message of biblical giving. Keller believes that we must draw three things out of Proverbs on the topic of money: the power of money, the reasons for this power, and how we are to break the power of money over our lives. Money has a rightful place in creation; Genesis teaches that we were created both to make and to own things. But money also has the power to corrupt our integrity, magnify our self-absorption, and distract us from what we are called to do as Christians. This is because we look to money, instead of to God, for our significance and security. To break the power of money, we must begin to look at it as seed. A farmer gains nothing from hoarding his seed; rather, by scattering his seed across the field, he prepares to gather an abundance of harvest. Finally, Keller reminds us that our generosity should imitate Christ’s; unless it is sacrificial, then our giving is superficial. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Riches That Bring No Sorrow
    A.W. Tozer. Sermon, n.d.
    Pastor, author and editor A.W. Tozer (1897-1963) expounds upon the verse Proverbs 10:22: “The blessing of the LORD brings wealth, and he adds no trouble to it.” Riches on earth, Tozer teaches, are temporal and will fade away. The only riches worth investing in are those the Lord bestows. This resource is available on streaming audio.

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Sermons (Proverbs 11)
    More on this verse

    Scattering Gathers, Gathering Scatters
    Timothy Keller. “Proverbs: True Wisdom for Living” sermon series, no. 8. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, October 31, 2004.
    Pastor Timothy Keller utilizes the paradox of money found in selected verses from Proverbs (chapters 10, 11, 13 and 30) to expound the message of biblical giving. Keller believes that we must draw three things out of Proverbs on the topic of money: the power of money, the reasons for this power, and how we are to break the power of money over our lives. Money has a rightful place in creation; Genesis teaches that we were created both to make and to own things. But money also has the power to corrupt our integrity, magnify our self-absorption, and distract us from what we are called to do as Christians. This is because we look to money, instead of to God, for our significance and security. To break the power of money, we must begin to look at it as seed. A farmer gains nothing from hoarding his seed; rather, by scattering his seed across the field, he prepares to gather an abundance of harvest. Finally, Keller reminds us that our generosity should imitate Christ’s; unless it is sacrificial, then our giving is superficial. This resource is available on streaming audio.

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Sermons (Proverbs 13)
    More on this verse

    Scattering Gathers, Gathering Scatters
    Timothy Keller. “Proverbs: True Wisdom for Living” sermon series, no. 8. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, October 31, 2004.
    Pastor Timothy Keller utilizes the paradox of money found in selected verses from Proverbs (chapters 10, 11, 13 and 30) to expound the message of biblical giving. Keller believes that we must draw three things out of Proverbs on the topic of money: the power of money, the reasons for this power, and how we are to break the power of money over our lives. Money has a rightful place in creation; Genesis teaches that we were created both to make and to own things. But money also has the power to corrupt our integrity, magnify our self-absorption, and distract us from what we are called to do as Christians. This is because we look to money, instead of to God, for our significance and security. To break the power of money, we must begin to look at it as seed. A farmer gains nothing from hoarding his seed; rather, by scattering his seed across the field, he prepares to gather an abundance of harvest. Finally, Keller reminds us that our generosity should imitate Christ’s; unless it is sacrificial, then our giving is superficial. This resource is available on streaming audio.

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Sermons (Proverbs 22)
    More on this verse

    Success God’s Way: Part 1
    Adrian Rogers. Getting on Top of Your Finances series, no. 2. Sermon, n.d.
    Training children differs greatly from merely teaching them. To train means to prepare for a contest, to instruct by exercise, to form to a proper shape or to discipline to use. Just as no one ever learns to play football by reading a book but must play the game on the field, children must receive practical exercise in righteousness as well. Pastor Adrian Rogers develops three characteristics of the sort of training that Proverbs 22:6 describes: (1) Training commences with childhood. Dedicating our children to the Lord, we start their training early because curiosity, memory, humility and trust are high in children. Tomorrow our children may not want to learn. (2) Training communicates with creativity. Since we cannot force feed the word of God to a child, we must be resourceful. Jesus would draw a lesson from even a commonplace activity. Rewards are also effective means of encouraging right living. (3) Training must correct with consistency. In his heart a child harbors foolishness and silliness that must be corrected. Discipline is an act of love that God Himself practices on His children. Children also need to realize that consequences follow wrong actions. Overall, Rogers offers several good principles for being wise stewards of the children God has entrusted to our care. This resource is available on compact disc.

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Sermons (Proverbs 30)
    More on this verse

    Scattering Gathers, Gathering Scatters
    Timothy Keller. “Proverbs: True Wisdom for Living” sermon series, no. 8. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, October 31, 2004.
    Pastor Timothy Keller utilizes the paradox of money found in selected verses from Proverbs (chapters 10, 11, 13 and 30) to expound the message of biblical giving. Keller believes that we must draw three things out of Proverbs on the topic of money: the power of money, the reasons for this power, and how we are to break the power of money over our lives. Money has a rightful place in creation; Genesis teaches that we were created both to make and to own things. But money also has the power to corrupt our integrity, magnify our self-absorption, and distract us from what we are called to do as Christians. This is because we look to money, instead of to God, for our significance and security. To break the power of money, we must begin to look at it as seed. A farmer gains nothing from hoarding his seed; rather, by scattering his seed across the field, he prepares to gather an abundance of harvest. Finally, Keller reminds us that our generosity should imitate Christ’s; unless it is sacrificial, then our giving is superficial. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Wherein Is a Middle Worldly Condition Most Eligible?
    John Oakes. The Morning Exercises, iii. 394-416.
    In this sermon based on Proverbs 30:8-9, Puritan preacher John Oaks addresses three particular groups of people: those who are poor, those who are rich, and those who are in the middle. First, he encourages the poor to take delight in their situation and throw themselves in dependence upon God. To the rich, he gives words reminding them of their responsibilities as stewards and challenges them to give freely in out of gratitude for what God has done in their lives. Lastly, to those who are neither rich nor poor, Oaks offers both caution and encouragement, telling them to be thankful for the blessings of God and to be content with what God has given. Strongly supported by the words of Scripture, this Puritan sermon is a thoughtful consideration of how the people of God should respond to material wealth.

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