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Stewardship Sermons (2 Corinthians)


Sermons (2 Corinthians 5)
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    The Reason for Ministry
    John MacArthur. Sermon preached at the annual meeting of The Gathering, Scottsdale, Ariz., September 27-30, 2001.
    2 Corinthians 5:18 is the definitive passage about why we live as believers on this earth. Since reconciliation is the ministry of the gospel in a nutshell, pastor John MacArthur examines several important elements of this word: (1) Reconciliation is by the will of God. Islam’s Allah and the Canaanite gods were distant or vicious deities. In contrast, God is by nature a Savior and a reconciler. In His mercy, He refrains from wiping out a sinful humanity; instead, He calls us back into fellowship with Him. (2) Reconciliation is by the act of forgiveness. Allah does not forgive, but our Heavenly Father forgives sins. However, we must recognize that we are the blind and oppressed He came to save. (3) Reconciliation is by the means of faith. The apostle Paul begs others to respond in faith to his message. He pleads with us to accept the provision that has been made. (4) Reconciliation is by Christ’s atoning sacrifice. If God is righteous, how can He forgive sin? Christ became our substitute, taking the punishment for our sin. In return, we are credited with the righteousness of Christ. Our ministry as Christians is to proclaim this message of reconciliation, investing not only our resources but also our lives in making known the salvation Christ offers. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

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Sermons (2 Corinthians 8)
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    Giving: Money and Me
    Andrew Chan. Sermon preached at Richmond (B.C.) Chinese Evangelical Free Church, June 2001.
    In this sermon outline on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9, pastor Andrew Chan presents a good general treatment of the New Testament’s teachings on giving, their importance and the benefits we derive from obeying them. Chan emphasizes our freedom in Christ when not bound to greed and materialism, when we become available for the grace of God to flow through us.

    The Example of Giving
    Jerry Locke. Five Sermons on Stewardship sermon series no. 2. Sermon preached at Lake Worth Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas, n.d.
    “Giving is not about your ability. It is about what God can do, and it is always more than you can imagine.” Pastor Jerry Locke holds up the example of the ancient Macedonian Christians (2 Corinthians 8:1-7; 9:1-15) to encourage believers today to give generously, no matter what. The Macedonians exhibited supernatural giving; their offerings overflowed, even though they were desperately poor and undergoing persecution; both “their joy” and “their deep poverty” contributed to their rich generosity. Locke puts forth the Macedonian church as an example both to motivate and to celebrate; while we praise God for the grace manifested in their giving, we should be encouraged to let God work beyond our ability to supply the work of his kingdom.

    The Excuses for Not Giving
    Jerry Locke. Five Sermons on Stewardship sermon series no. 3. Sermon preached at Lake Worth Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas, n.d.
    “It takes no faith to wait to give when you have extra. That is like saying, ‘When the harvest comes in, I will plant the seed.’ ” Pastor Jerry Locke examines the excuses that we often give for withholding our money from God as he studies the example of the church of ancient Corinth (2 Corinthians 8:6-9:4). They had the potential to be generous givers, and they had given their promise a year earlier to contribute to the famine relief in Jerusalem, but they needed to be prodded on by the apostle Paul to fulfill their pledge. We must learn, like the ancient Corinthians, that we really cannot afford not to give. Additionally, see Generous Giving’s list of common excuses for not giving to the Lord’s work.

    The Eminent Giver of All
    Jerry Locke. Five Sermons on Stewardship sermon series no. 4. Sermon preached at Lake Worth Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas, n.d.
    Although the ancient Macedonian church was a noteworthy example of Christian stewardship, pastor Jerry Locke points us to the preeminent example of generosity—Jesus Christ himself (2 Corinthians 8:9). Our Savior left the unimaginable riches of his deity and embraced abject poverty here on earth so that we might enjoy his infinite wealth. His mission involved a gracious self-emptying for our sakes; likewise, our mission is to give richly of ourselves so that others might share in the riches of God.

    A Biblical Model For Giving: Part 1
    John MacArthur. A Biblical Model For Giving sermon series, no. 1. Sermon preached 1997.
    Pastor John MacArthur explains from 2 Corinthians 8:1-3 that it is more blessed to give than to receive. Do we want to know what it means to be blessed? We should give. What does it then mean to give? Many converts traveled to Jerusalem in the time of the early church. Their conversion meant that they would become poor, if they were not already so. Oftentimes they no longer could hold their affluent positions in society, nor could they return to the homes they had left behind. For these early believers, converting to Christ meant that they were in effect giving up all that they had. MacArthur explains that this was especially the case among the Christians in Macedonia. Those who remained in their native land were under intense persecution. It was in the midst of this hardship that they gave to the needy church in Jerusalem, even beyond their ability to give. MacArthur presents this as a model for our own giving today: self-sacrificial and unconditional.

    A Biblical Model For Giving: Part 2
    John MacArthur. A Biblical Model For Giving sermon series, no. 2. Sermon preached 1997.
    Pastor John MacArthur opens this sermon on 2 Corinthians 8:1-2 by explaining why the apostle Paul wrote his letter to the church at Corinth: to implore them to give to their poor brothers in Jerusalem. Highlighting Paul’s reference to the Macedonian churches, MacArthur extracts several characteristics of their sacrificial giving: (1) Their motivation for giving was the grace of God in their lives. (2) Their giving transcended their turbulent situation. (3) They gave with joy and happiness. (4) Their extremely poor conditions did not hinder them from giving sacrificially. (5) They gave generously. The Macedonians gave in faith, putting the kingdom of God first ahead of anything else.

    A Biblical Model For Giving: Part 3
    John MacArthur. A Biblical Model For Giving sermon series, no. 3. Sermon preached 1997.
    Examining 2 Corinthians 8:3, pastor John MacArthur continues his description from a previous sermon of the sacrificial giving of the Macedonian Christians: (6) They gave proportionately according to their ability. (7) They gave in sacrificial proportions. (8) They gave voluntarily. MacArthur finds sacrificial giving incompatible with the traditional notion of the tithe. He spends a considerable amount of time explaining the nature of tithes in the Old Testament, arguing that this antiquated system of giving does not continue apart from the temple system in the New Testament age. Surveying the Old Testament, MacArthur explains that a required amount for giving was not introduced until the Law of Moses. There were several tithes: one tithe in the form of taxation to fund the religious responsibilities of the Levites and the priests; another tithe for festivals, feasts and national celebrations; and still another tithe to be given every third year to support the stranger, the fatherless and the widow. Beyond these God called his people to freewill giving: People gave voluntarily out of thanksgiving and gratitude to God. While the New Testament certainly expects us to pay taxes to human government, our giving to the Lord is no longer as prescriptive as it once was, but freewill, not according to any set percentage.

    A Biblical Model For Giving: Part 4
    John MacArthur. A Biblical Model For Giving sermon series, no. 4. Sermon preached 1997.
    Pastor John MacArthur argues from 2 Corinthians 8:4-8 that giving principally is the same in both the Old and New Testaments. It is simply not the case that people today are required to give one-tenth of their incomes, nor has anyone ever been required to give merely this tithe: Rather, the law required the Israelites to give roughly 25 percent of their incomes for the maintenance of the government and community. Anything beyond this was considered freewill offerings to the Lord. Christians today still must pay taxes for the maintenance of our civil government, and our giving to the Lord beyond what is required is considered freewill offerings as well. The tithe, argues MacArthur, has never been about gifts to God but taxes to human authorities. On the other hand, giving to the Lord is a generous, spontaneous and joyful act in response to the grace that God has done in our hearts. In closing, MacArthur concludes his description from a previous sermon of the giving patterns of the churches in Macedonia; how the grace of God turned them into voluntary, sacrificial and joyous givers: (9) Their giving was a privilege, not an obligation. (10) Their giving was an act of worship. (11) They gave in submission to their pastors. (12) Their giving was in concert with other Christian virtues. (13) Their giving proved their love.

    Graced by a Provision beyond Ourselves
    Mark D. Roberts. Sermon preached at Irvine Presbyterian Church, Irvine, Calif., October 31, 2004.
    In 2 Corinthians 8:1-5 the apostle Paul tells us of the generosity of the Macedonian Christians: “And now, brothers, we want you to know about the grace that God has given the Macedonian churches. Out of the most severe trial, their overflowing joy and their extreme poverty welled up in rich generosity. For I testify that they gave as much as they were able, and even beyond their ability. Entirely on their own, they urgently pleaded with us for the privilege of sharing in this service to the saints. And they did not do as we expected, but they gave themselves first to the Lord and then to us in keeping with God’s will.” Pastor Roberts explains that giving generously comes from a heart that does not fear money but, rather, fears the Lord. The Lord is steadfast in his promises, providing for our needs even when it seems that provision is unavailable. In the Old Testament the Lord provided for Abraham when he trusted the Lord, even when he called Abraham to sacrifice his own son. Pastor Roberts recounts several instances in his own church in which God greatly provided for the church when people gave in the fear of the Lord. Read also how the Lord provided financially for Irvine Presbyterian Church’s building and for a recent minister in the congregation.

    Unexpected Giving
    David P. Nolte. Sermon preached at Shasta Way Christian Church, Klamath Falls, Ore., n.d.
    In this sermon on 2 Corinthians 8:1-5, 9:7, pastor David P. Nolte examines the three ways that the Macedonian church gave to the church in Judea. Their generosity was all the more evident given the dire poverty that they were in. They gave willingly, urgently pleading with the apostle Paul to share their resources with the saints; they did not need to be “guilted” into giving. Most importantly, the Macedonians gave themselves, both to the Lord and to his saints. The Macedonians went beyond what was expected, setting an example for all Christians to follow.

    The Biblical View of Money: Part 1
    John MacArthur. The Biblical View of Money series, no. 1. Sermon preached 1997.
    This sermon on 2 Corinthians 8-9 seeks to establish a biblical perspective on giving, in order to change the prevailing attitude of guilt to one of eager participation in God’s kingdom. Author and pastor John MacArthur notes that the Macedonian Christians begged the apostle Paul to allow them the opportunity to give. They realized that blessing and riches, both spiritual and material, come as a result of generosity. Today’s culture tries to persuade us to spend our money on shortsighted projects. Yet if everything we own belongs to God, then we must give Him an account of how we spend His resources. Money is a neutral tool that can be used for either good or bad; it reveals the heart condition of the one wielding it. A love of money leads to idolatry, or a dependence upon the power of something other than God for one’s security and driving motivation.

    The Biblical View of Money: Part 2
    John MacArthur. The Biblical View of Money series, no. 2. Sermon preached 1997.
    In this sermon on 2 Corinthians 8-9, pastor and author John MacArthur examines the relationship between money and the heart. Money indicates one’s spiritual condition: When Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10) and the rich young ruler (Luke 18:18-23) were offered salvation, their level of willingness to come to Christ was reflected in their attitudes toward money. The wealthy builder in Luke 12:16-21 failed to be rich toward God though he was materially wealthy. In contrast, the poor widow at the temple (Mark 12:41-44) gave all she had. God labeled the man a fool while commending the widow as wise. Where we invest reveals where our hearts will be; the love of money leads to our trusting in money rather than in God. Since riches are deceptive and can lead to compromised convictions, we must acquire money carefully. We must gain wealth honestly, not by gambling, cheating or stealing. We must not charge interest of the needy or withhold the wages of our employees.

    The Biblical View of Money: Part 4
    John MacArthur. The Biblical View of Money series, no. 4. Sermon preached 1997.
    This sermon in speaker and author John MacArthur’s series on 2 Corinthians 8-9 continues to examine how to acquire money and how to use it. The greatest way to acquire money is through work. The second way to acquire money is through saving. Finally, we acquire money through budgeting expenses and avoiding debt. We often lack finances because of stinginess (we reap little because we sow little), hasty spending, lack of discipline, laziness, indulgence and craftiness (get-rich-quick schemes). Once we have money, we should use it to provide for our families, pay our debts, save for the future and give to God. The money we have belongs to Christ, but we have been given possessions to manage now in order to demonstrate our ability to handle heavenly treasures. Four principles help us to achieve joyful generosity: (1) The ownership of our money is transferred to God. (2) The goal and purpose of our lives is set to advance the kingdom of God. (3) Our lifestyles are free enough to respond to the Lord’s direction; in other words, we have no debt. (4) We realize that our giving will invest in eternity.

    Generous Giving: Part 1
    John MacArthur. Sermon preached at the annual meeting of The Gathering, Scottsdale, Ariz., September 27-30, 2001.
    When the Jerusalem church began to suffer from poverty, the apostle Paul seized the opportunity in order to demolish the hostility between the Gentile and Jewish churches. When he asked the Gentile churches he had founded to aid their Jewish brothers in Jerusalem, the response in Corinth was enthusiastic. Yet false teachers had undermined Paul’s authority, and the Corinthians had failed to follow through on their promises to give. Paul, then, wrote a letter to reestablish his credentials and, in 2 Corinthians 8:1-8, addressed once again the topic of the Jerusalem offering. He used the example of the poor Macedonian churches to encourage the wealthy Corinthians’ own generosity. The Macedonians’ giving exhibited several characteristics: (1) Their giving was launched by God’s grace. We hunger and thirst after righteousness, not because of emotion, but because of God’s grace. (2) Their giving transcended their financial affliction. The Macedonian region had suffered from civil war and oppression. Yet often, the less we have, the more we trust in the Lord; and the more we trust in the Lord, the closer we draw to Him and live as He would have us live. (3) Their giving was done in joy. The Macedonians’ joy rose above their pain, because they knew that they were storing up treasure in heaven. (4) Their giving was not hindered by their poverty. Just as the church in Third World regions today lives in excited hope of heaven, so the Macedonians, having nothing here, looked ahead to when they would have everything. Author and pastor John MacArthur speaks insightfully, encouraging the church today to pursue joyful generosity. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Generous Giving: Part 2
    John MacArthur. Sermon preached at the annual meeting of The Gathering, Scottsdale, Ariz., September 27-30, 2001.
    In this continuation of his message on 2 Corinthians 8:1-8, author and pastor John MacArthur continues to examine the characteristics of the Macedonians’ giving: (5) Their giving was generous. “Liberality” signifies single-minded focus and serious commitment. The Macedonians’ one objective was the advancement of the gospel; they were generous out of their devotion to Jesus Christ. (6) Their giving was according to their ability. We are called to give whatever we want to give. Though the Old Testament tithe existed as an obligatory payment in theocratic Israel, the church has no prescribed amount for voluntary giving. Yet 2 Corinthians 9:6 does provide a principle concerning quantity of gifts: “Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously.” Thus, we look forward to the offering as an opportunity to invest in heavenly blessing. (7) Their giving was beyond their ability, or sacrificial. (8) Their giving was an act of participation in the fellowship of the saints. The Macedonians begged to be allowed to give, that they might engage in a partnership of ministry, for the support of the saints. (9) Their giving was an act of worship. The Macedonians first gave themselves to the Lord, after which act, everything they had came, too. Long-term faithful giving is in direct proportion to the sanctification of the heart. The ultimate example of generosity is the Lord Jesus. He first suffered death that separated Him from the Father in order that we might inherit the spiritual riches of God now and all the riches of God in heaven. Again, MacArthur speaks insightfully, encouraging the church today toward joyful generosity. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    The Grace of Giving
    Adrian Rogers. Getting on Top of Your Finances series, no. 6. Sermon, n.d.
    All giving is wrapped in grace: We give in response to Jesus’ own gift of Himself. Pastor Adrian Rogers finds that generosity exists for the purposes of magnifying Jesus and His name, for moving believers toward maturity and for making Jesus known to others in our community and world. 2 Corinthians 8:1-9:15 teaches three major points concerning grace giving: (1) The obligation of grace giving: Grace giving is not eliminated by poverty. The Macedonians had nothing yet still gave joyfully. Nor is grace giving energized by pressure from external sources, excused by performance in other areas of spiritual growth, or enforced by power from a leader. Rather, we must be motivated by love for the One who died at Calvary. (2) The operation of grace giving: Grace giving is marked by performance, in which we act out what we profess, and by providence, in which we give according to how God has blessed us. Grace giving also is managed by prudence, as we allow our gifts to be handled by men of compassion, consecration, character and competency. (3) The opportunity of grace giving: Grace giving allows us to encourage the saints, to enrich the soil of our harvest and to exalt the Savior. When we give richly because of the salvation we have received, we bring great glory to God. This resource is available on compact disc.

    The Grace Principle
    John Meador. Treasure Principles: Jesus on Giving sermon series, no. 6. Sermon preached at Woodland Park Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., July 14, 2002.
    In the sixth sermon of his series on Jesus’ principles of generosity from Matthew 6:19-34, pastor John Meador turns further to 2 Corinthians 8:1-9:15 to examine the principle of grace. Grace giving is not simply one Christian meeting the needs of another person but rather God working through that Christian in order to produce his desire to give. Since generosity is a test that proves one’s spiritual maturity, God does not ask us to give because He needs our money, but because we need to give in order to promote growth. Though the Macedonian Christians are an excellent example of joyful giving, our ultimate example of generosity is the Savior, who gave all He had for us. The apostle Paul’s letter to the Corinthians provides several principles of grace giving: (1) We need to follow through on initial enthusiasm to give. (2) Church leaders need to be full of integrity when they manage church funds. (3) God leads us to give to particular needs. (4) God liberates us in our giving. The natural man is not excited about giving, but God stirs our hearts. (5) God blesses us in our giving. We will have an abundance in order to be liberal in our generosity. We are able to give abundantly beyond the tithe because God creates in us the attitude of grace-filled giving. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Making Good Sense with Our Dollars
    Charles R. Swindoll. A Minister Everyone Would Respect sermon series, no. 1. Sermon preached 1987.
    Pastor Charles Swindoll looks at 2 Corinthians 8:1-9 for biblical principles of generosity. Giving must be based upon the grace of God; the Macedonians had given themselves to God prior to their sacrificial generosity. Yet grace received from God results in the release of our treasure for God’s work, along with everything else we have. God owns everything already, including our lives. Those who give sacrificially probably experience the most happiness. Swindoll urges Christians not to calculate percentages such as the tithe but simply to keep giving more, for grace-filled generosity gives beyond 10 percent. Christ gave 100 percent for us at the cross, becoming poor for our sakes. Overall, Swindoll provides a solid basis for joy-filled generosity that flows from a life transformed by Christ’s gracious gift of salvation. This sermon is available on audiocassette.

    Fanning the Financial Fires
    Charles R. Swindoll. A Minister Everyone Would Respect sermon series, no. 2. Sermon preached 1987.
    Pastor Charles Swindoll continues his series on money, examining 2 Corinthians 8:10-24 for biblical principles of generosity. Several famous wits have noted the importance of money to our culture. We are enslaved to its power. Yet one simple truth will bring financial freedom: God owns it all. Even a Christian’s life was bought with the blood of Christ. The apostle Paul exhorted the Corinthians to stop and consider the blessings of God, to listen to the testimony of others and to look at the grace of Christ. Yet four hindrances often obstruct the generous intentions of Christians motivated by such compelling incentives: (1) Procastination: The cure for this hindrance is to simply do one’s giving right away. (2) Hesitation: To overcome hesitation, one should be ready and eager to give. (3) Overreaction: We think we have to give as much as the next man, but we do not need to have vast resources in order to be able to give generously. (4) Exception: The call to generosity applies to everyone, including those who don’t think they have enough to share. Paul’s strategy in fund-raising demonstrates two principles of church money management: that only qualified people should handle financial matters and that money matters should be handled by a team. Finally, generosity frees us from the dominion of money, releasing us from its hold on our hearts. Swindoll provides a solid basis for joy-filled giving that flows from a life transformed by Christ’s gracious gift of salvation. This sermon is available on audiocassette.

    Cross-Centered Giving
    C.J. Mahaney. Sermon preached at Covenant Life Church, Gaithersburg, Md., October 21, 2001.
    After delivering a lengthy, heartfelt and emotional expression of gratitude for the generosity of his congregation, C.J. Mahaney proceeds in the second half of this message to examine 2 Corinthians 8:8-24 for biblical principles of generosity. The apostle Paul never wants us to act without a theological basis; nor does he ever want us to hold a theology without practically applying it. Thus, Mahaney develops three principles of cross-centered giving: (1) Cross-centered giving creates personal participation. Good intentions are insufficient but must be acted out concretely. When everyone works together, they can accomplish much. (2) Cross-centered giving is careful to display integrity. If a church does not have financial integrity, it loses its credibility to preach the gospel. (3) Cross-centered giving is conscious of its effects. The generosity of one church can challenge and inspire the generosity of other congregations. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    The North Is Inspired by the South
    Johnny Hunt. Sermon preached at First Baptist Church, Woodstock, Ga., July 25, 2004.
    In this sermon preached on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9, Johnny Hunt shows from Scripture that “giving is more of an opportunity than an obligation.” In his exegesis of the passage, he highlights the grace of God and the response of man to that grace as the basis for generous giving. Giving “commences with God’s generosity” because it is God’s grace that moves us to give, both through Christ’s work on the cross and through the Spirit’s work within us. God’s grace produced in the Macedonian Christians, whom Paul holds up as an example, an “abundance of joy” which overflowed in giving “beyond their ability.” They not only gave willingly but also pleaded for the opportunity to give more because their joyful response to the grace of God made giving into a privilege, not an obligation. This resource also is available in streaming media.

    The Ministry of Giving
    George O. Wood. Sermon preached at Newport-Mesa Christian Center, Costa Mesa, Calif., n.d.
    In 2 Corinthians 8-9, the Apostle Paul describes to the church of Corinth how they should give. George O. Wood, general secretary of the Assemblies of God, looks at this passage to describe the ministry of giving. According to this sermon, (1) our true motive for giving should always be the grace of God; (2) the example of others is a legitimate inspiration for our giving; (3) our concern for excellence should include our giving; (4) giving is patterned after the example of Christ, who gave out of love; (5) we should give what we can even if it is not all we desire to give; (6) there should be equal sacrifice throughout the body of Christ; (7) we need assurance that the offerings we give will be properly accounted for and administered; (8) our enthusiasm in giving is catching; (9) those who sow bountifully will reap bountifully; and (10) our giving should result in praise being given to God. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Give is a Four Letter ‘G’ Word
    Neil Chadwick. Sermon preached at Crossroads Church, Hamburg, N.J., n.d.
    Assemblies of God pastor Neil Chadwick examines 2 Corinthians 8-9 in this sermon on giving. “ ‘Give’ is associated with God’s grace, gathering and gaining according to our true needs, and so that we may bless others. We give generously and gladly, providing whatever guarantees are necessary to produce confidence, and we seek to grow in the gift of giving so that righteousness may prevail.”

    The Secret of Giving
    Donald Grey Barnhouse. Sermon preached on “The Bible Study Hour” radio broadcast, n.d.
    While acknowledging his prior failure to preach to his congregation on the subject of giving, the long-time pastor of Philadelphia’s Tenth Presbyterian Church proceeds in preaching to his radio audience a dynamic sermon on the Christian’s calling to give to God. Barnhouse (1895-1960) teaches here from 2 Corinthians 8:1-9, showing that the principle of Christian giving is not a matter of dollars and cents—it involves giving ourselves fully to God. “When you give God your heart, everything else you have will be His also.” Yielding ourselves to God will result, naturally, in giving our money and possessions to Him as well. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Giving Generously
    Bob Coy. Sermon preached at Calvary Chapel, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., May 15, 1988.
    The Jordan River feeds two bodies of water in the Holy Land: The one, the Sea of Galilee, supports a variety of life because an outlet keeps the supply of water circulating and therefore fresh. The other, the Dead Sea, has no outlet, and the water that accumulates within its banks stagnates and kills all surrounding life. Thus, the Christian who gives away what he receives is the one who will impart life and blessing and reap reward. But what characterizes a “Galilean” giver? Several principles can be drawn from 2 Corinthians 8:1-24 and the beginning verses of the following chapter. A generous giver (1) is full of enthusiasm and initiative, operating upon God-given desires and actively seeking areas of service, (2) desires to advance the gospel, (3) is concerned with honoring God’s name rather than his own, (4) cultivates a reputation for honesty, (5) exercises a cooperative spirit, promoting unity rather than division, (6) fulfills previous promises of giving, (7) recognizes the principle of reciprocity (i.e., a large harvest requires a large sowing, and that if we don’t pour ourselves out, we will soon have nothing to pour), (8) seeks to align his motives with those of Christ, giving cheerfully rather than grudgingly, and (9) does not put off giving today, realizing that because God has already met all his spiritual needs, He is able to meet his physical needs as well. The generous giver who faithfully demonstrates these principles will bring blessing not only to the recipient of his gifts but also to himself and any others who hear of his work. Yet most importantly, such giving will result in praise to God. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    The Proof of Love
    Ian Garrett. Sermon preached at Jesmond Parish Church, Newcastle, England, January 25, 1998.
    How do you motivate giving without being open to the criticism of manipulation? Leaders need to be above reproach when handling the church’s finances. However respectable one person may be, it is important to have several leaders keeping one another accountable in the oversight of funds: For example, the Jesmond Church has a financial committee of eight members. Following in Paul’s example (2 Corinthians 8:19-20), there needs to be not just trustworthy people handling the money but also a trustworthy structure that ensures integrity. Also essential is the question, “Is our money being spent on gospel-centered activity?” When financial promises are made, the church needs to follow through with the keeping of these promises. And, finally, the leadership should encourage the people to give not out of a response to them but, rather, as a response to God and His grace. Faithfulness in generosity is a matter of both action and attitude. This sermon examines 2 Corinthians 8:16-9:5.

    Giving and the Believer
    Iliya Majam. Kenya Church Growth Bulletin, July 1, 1994.
    This concise sermon outline provides a helpful framework for those who desire to give a clear and focused sermon on giving by the Christian. Taken from 2 Chronicles 31:1-10 and 2 Corinthians 8:1-21, the purpose of the sermon is to show that disciplined and planed giving is a responsibility of every believer. While the introduction asks the congregation how it feels when asked to give, the body of the sermon addresses proper motives when giving. Also addressed is the topic of church finance management—who should oversee the church budget and how the leadership should seek to be above reproach.

    Rich Generosity
    Jonathan Pryke. Sermon preached at Jesmond Parish Church, Newcastle, England, January 25, 1998.
    There is probably a big difference between how generous we think we are and how generous we actually are. What we do with our money is related to our response to the gospel call, and the Apostle Paul does not treat it as a matter of indifference in 2 Corinthians 8. “What we do with our money shows whether we have understood and responded to the gospel.” The Macedonian church gives us a great example of care and concern for fellow believers, as “out of the most severe trial, their overflowing joy and their extreme poverty welled up in rich generosity” (1 Corinthians 8:2). Generosity is also a test of love: Martin Luther said that we need two conversions, one for our hearts and one for our wallets. Finally, giving should flow from those who have much to those who have little.

    Paul’s Plan for Raising Money
    Archibald Thomas Robertson. In Classic Sermons on Stewardship. Warren W. Wiersbe, comp. The Kregel Classic Sermons Series. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications, 1999.
    Archibald Thomas Robertson (1863-1934), professor of New Testament interpretation at Southern Baptist Seminary for nearly 40 years and noted scholarly author, justifies the importance of sermons on the topic of generous giving by examining Paul’s own fund-raising message in 2 Corinthians 8-9. The apostle was not ashamed to ask the church for money, and eight particular reasons support his exhortations to give: (1) The poor Macedonians had already given in abundance (were the wealthy Corinthians going to let themselves be outdone?). (2) The Corinthians needed to fulfill their earlier pledge to help. (3) The act of giving is a concrete demonstration of love. (4) Giving generously follows the pattern of Jesus Christ, who first gave Himself for us. (5) Giving under grace should exceed the minimum amount of the tithe. (6) The Corinthians’ gifts will be managed honestly. (7) Those who sow generously will also reap generously. Finally, (8) the act of giving generously will elicit gratitude to God in the hearts of both givers and recipients. Since Paul was not afraid to preach generosity, why should the church hesitate today?

    Giving until It Lowers Our Lifestyle: 2 Corinthians 8:1-9
    Dennis Rupert. Sermon preached at New Life Community Church, Stafford, Va.
    2 Corinthians 8 deals with an offering Paul was receiving for the believers in Judea. While this chapter focuses primarily on a special relief offering, Paul’s words help us grasp some of the principles and promises of all Christian giving. Paul’s fund-raising methods have much in common with those of today. But notice that although he has plenty of intelligence about practical matters, he brings everything—the gift itself, the motivations for giving, the remarks about the “fund-raising committee,” the allusions to the reactions of the recipients, even the “Jewish mother guilt trips” which he lays on the Corinthians—into the service of glorifying God. Here are eight principles for Christian giving from 2 Corinthians 8.

    Giving: Mission and Ministry
    Michael Scanlan. Sermon preached at the Generous Giving Conference for Catholics, Naples, Fla., November 8-10, 2002.

    2 Corinthians 8:7 says, “Now as you excel in everything—in faith, in utterance, in knowledge, in all earnestness, and in your love for us—see that you excel in the grace of giving also.” It is often difficult, however, to know how to prioritize in our giving strategies, and Scanlan offers helpful directives: (1) Like the good Samaritan, we should respond to immediate needs when they come. (2) We should provide for our families and give to our local churches and their ministries. (3) Our attention must then turn to worldwide ministry. It is this that often causes the most confusion since there are so many needs to be met. Some questions to consider on this front include: Does the ministry conform to God’s published will? Is it bringing people into the kingdom, to a closer relationship with God? Does your heart say “yes?” In considering where to put our treasure for Kingdom advancement, we should follow our heart’s lead. This resource also is available on compact disc.

    Ten Principles of Christian Giving
    John R.W. Stott. Sermon preached at All Souls Church, Langham Place, London, September 19, 1999.
    “It is well known that the apostle Paul organized a collection from the Greek churches of Achaia and Macedonia for the benefit of the impoverished churches of Judea. It may seem extraordinary that he should have devoted so much space in his letters to this mundane matter, referring to it in Romans 15, 1 Corinthians 16, and 2 Corinthians 8-9. But Paul did not see it as a mundane matter. On the contrary he saw it as relating to the grace of God, the cross of Christ, and the unity of the Holy Spirit. In fact, it is very moving to grasp this combination of profound Trinitarian theology and practical common sense.” Noted teacher Dr. John Stott goes on to expound 2 Corinthians 8-9, highlighting 10 important principles of giving (from the text) which provide helpful teaching on this crucial issue for the contemporary church: (1) Christian giving is an expression of the grace of God, (2) Christian giving can be a gift of the Spirit, (3) Christian giving is inspired by the cross of Christ, (4) Christian giving is proportionate giving, (5) Christian giving contributes to equality, (6) Christian giving must be carefully supervised, (7) Christian giving can be stimulated by a little friendly competition, (8) Christian giving resembles a harvest, (9) Christian giving has symbolic significance and (10) Christian giving promotes thanksgiving to God. Do you want your practice of giving to be challenged and shaped by sound biblical teaching? Understanding and applying these basic principles from Paul’s writing can help to raise our giving to another level as it grounds us in a more thoughtful, more systematic, and more sacrificial approach to generous giving. An edited version of this sermon was published as a booklet, Stott on Stewardship: Ten Principles of Christian Giving. This resource also is available on audiocassette.

    The Supreme Gift to Jesus
    George W. Truett. In Classic Sermons on Stewardship. Warren W. Wiersbe, comp. The Kregel Classic Sermons Series. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications, 1999.
    The prominent Southern Baptist preacher George W. Truett (1867-1944) uses Paul’s commendation of the Macedonian Christians in 2 Corinthians 8:5 to illustrate exemplary giving. Two principles dominate the Macedonians’ spirit of giving: (1) They put Christ’s cause in its proper primary position. (2) They gave not simply fragments of themselves but, rather, all of themselves. Obedience to the first principle leads to application of the second; when one recognizes that obedience to Christ must take precedence over all else, then he understands that nothing can be held back. Our money, time and gifts must all be devoted to God’s service. Yet more important than any one of these multiple components is the gift of the whole: God wants our very lives.

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Sermons (2 Corinthians 9)
    More on this verse

    Are You Eager to Serve?
    Mike Hays. Sermon preached at Britton Christian Church, Oklahoma City, Okla., September 1998.
    Pastor Mike Hays recounts the story of two couples to illustrate two different responses to the challenge of stewardship. Do we grudgingly obey God’s call to give, or do we realize the great opportunity we have in this ministry to the Lord and others? Hays encourages us to set a positive, life-transforming example to others through our eagerness and cheerfulness in giving. This sermon draws from 2 Corinthians 9:6-15.

    Giving Opens Doors
    Wade Martin Hughes, Sr. Sermon preached at Faith Assembly of God, Smiths Grove, Ky., May 2002.
    In this sermon that starts with 2 Corinthians 9:7, Pentecostal youth minister Wade Martin Hughes, Sr., explains how to develop a positive course of action to give and minister in the church. This outline contains helpful thoughts and Scripture references on both what to give and how to give. The central idea is to seek to be a blessing in all we give and do.

    Grace-Full Living
    Paul Decker. Sermon preached at Randall Memorial Baptist Church, Williamsville, N.Y., August 27, 2000.
    Grace-full living is the willingness to let God’s grace flow through us in a way that will bless other people, all the while blessing us in the process. In this sermon filled with inspiring and often humorous stories, pastor Paul Decker exhorts us from 2 Corinthians 9:6-15 to live the kind of cheerful and unselfish lives that give out of love, not obligation. Grace-full living is generous living; how freely does God’s generosity and grace flow through us?

    The Challenges of Being a Cheerful Giver
    Joseph A. Betz. Sermon preached at Setauket (N.Y.) Presbyterian Church, October 22, 2006.
    The question “How much should I give?” gets down to the core questions “What does it mean to be a Christian? What is the Church’s role in today’s society?” Joseph Betz, preaching from 2 Corinthians 9:6-15, says that there is no litmus test for how much we must give as believers, for this passage treats us as mature, grown-up believers. “Each of you must give as you have made up your mind, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.” The place to begin in deciding how much to give is to realize our essential Christian responsibility to provide for the poor and the oppressed. We cannot expect the state to be the “safety net” for the poor, the sick and the elderly in society. Not only does that safety net have many holes, but it also doesn’t consider the alien and foreigner in the land. Are they people, too? Should they be shown mercy? Betz maintains that the responsibility of the church goes beyond just caring for people who fall through the cracks in our social safety system. The responsibility of the church is to be the voice for the voiceless, the advocate for social and economic justice. “It is an ethic and ethos that constantly challenges government, business and institutions to morally do the right thing.” The early church demonstrated this ethic and ethos of social responsibility in remarkable ways—Why can’t we?

    The Treasure Principle
    Randy Alcorn. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s Pacific Northwest annual fall conference, Stevenson, Wash., October 19-21, 2006.
    Why has God entrusted American Christians with so much wealth? Author and former pastor Randy Alcorn believes the answer is found in Scripture: “You will be made rich in every way so that you can be generous on every occasion” (2 Corinthians 9:11a). Christians are God’s Fed-Ex workers on this earth. Our job is not to keep what he gives for ourselves but, rather, to deliver it to its intended destination. But Christian giving is much more than a rote duty; we have exciting incentives to give as well: (1) to live out God’s grace; (2) to receive an eternal treasure in heaven which will not fade; (3) to experience joy and fulfillment. Jesus taught us, “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal” (Matthew 6:19-20). In other words, Jesus urges us not to renounce treasure but to relocate it to a safer place. Alcorn explicates several passages which teach the “treasure principle” of pursuing eternal treasure, and these are the six key points: (1) God owns everything, and I’m his money manager. (2) My heart always goes where I put God’s money. (3) Heaven—the new earth—is my home, not this present earth that is under the curse of sin. (4) I should live not for the dot but for the line—not for my own short life but for eternity. (5) Giving is the only antidote to materialism. (6) God prospers me not to raise my standard of living, but to raise my standard of giving. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Be Not Afraid (to Give)
    Andy Stanley. Sermon preached at the annual Generous Giving Conference, Atlanta, Ga., April 20-22, 2006.
    Our all-too-often refusal to give more generously is not usually due to a lack of desire on our part; it is usually because we are too afraid. We worry about what could happen in the future if we give to God rather than build for our financial security. In this sermon based partly on his book Fields of Gold, pastor and author Andy Stanley addresses this fear by a much-needed change in perspective: We need to see ourselves as farmers. Farmers know that the only way to secure their future is to sow as much seed as they can; hoarding seed will not accomplish much. Our money is the seed God has given us to grow a harvest for his kingdom, and he promises in 2 Corinthians 9:10-11 that he will “multiply our seed” and “increase the harvest” of our generosity if only we will be faithful to sow. If God can be trusted with our eternal salvation, can’t he be trusted with our future financial security as well? Stanley encourages us to give without fear, resting in the arms of him who has promised to provide for our every need. This resource is available on compact disc.

    The Example of Giving
    Jerry Locke. Five Sermons on Stewardship sermon series no. 2. Sermon preached at Lake Worth Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas, n.d.
    “Giving is not about your ability. It is about what God can do, and it is always more than you can imagine.” Pastor Jerry Locke holds up the example of the ancient Macedonian Christians (2 Corinthians 8:1-7; 9:1-15) to encourage believers today to give generously, no matter what. The Macedonians exhibited supernatural giving; their offerings overflowed, even though they were desperately poor and undergoing persecution; both “their joy” and “their deep poverty” contributed to their rich generosity. Locke puts forth the Macedonian church as an example both to motivate and to celebrate; while we praise God for the grace manifested in their giving, we should be encouraged to let God work beyond our ability to supply the work of his kingdom.

    The Excuses for Not Giving
    Jerry Locke. Five Sermons on Stewardship sermon series no. 3. Sermon preached at Lake Worth Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas, n.d.
    “It takes no faith to wait to give when you have extra. That is like saying, ‘When the harvest comes in, I will plant the seed.’ ” Pastor Jerry Locke examines the excuses that we often give for withholding our money from God as he studies the example of the church of ancient Corinth (2 Corinthians 8:6-9:4). They had the potential to be generous givers, and they had given their promise a year earlier to contribute to the famine relief in Jerusalem, but they needed to be prodded on by the apostle Paul to fulfill their pledge. We must learn, like the ancient Corinthians, that we really cannot afford not to give. Additionally, see Generous Giving’s list of common excuses for not giving to the Lord’s work.

    The Elements of Giving
    Jerry Locke. Five Sermons on Stewardship sermon series no. 5. Sermon preached at Lake Worth Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas, n.d.
    Pastor Jerry Locke wraps up his five-part sermon series on stewardship with an exposition of the four main elements of giving: choice, cheerfulness, completeness and contentment (2 Corinthians 9:6-15). The apostle Paul presents us with a choice in verses 6-7: Do we want to sow (and reap) sparingly, or bountifully? God will not “shake us down”; he will leave it to us to decide what return we would like to reap. A choice to give generously involves a cheerful spirit; the joy of our salvation should (and will) blossom out of our giving (verse 7). There is a completeness that we experience by giving, knowing that God will supply our every need (verse 8). And because we have exhibited Christ’s generosity, we will experience his contentment, “being enriched in every thing” (verse 11). There is nothing more fulfilling or rewarding than a life of generosity.

    The Principles of Proper Giving!
    David P. Nolte. Sermon preached at Shasta Way Christian Church, Klamath Falls, Ore., n.d.
    Pastor David P. Nolte asks us what kind of givers we are. Are we flints, that have to be struck repeatedly to get a small spark? Are we sponges, that have to be squeezed before God can get anything out of us? Or are we honeycombs, that overflow freely with what is within us? Using the example of a painting of a dying church (which was beautiful and well kept outwardly, but inside the treasury was bare and dusty), Nolte encourages us in this sermon on 2 Corinthians 9:6-9 to embody the principles of proper giving that will stimulate life and growth, both in individuals and in churches.

    Unexpected Giving
    David P. Nolte. Sermon preached at Shasta Way Christian Church, Klamath Falls, Ore., n.d.
    In this sermon on 2 Corinthians 8:1-5, 9:7, pastor David P. Nolte examines the three ways that the Macedonian church gave to the church in Judea. Their generosity was all the more evident given the dire poverty that they were in. They gave willingly, urgently pleading with the apostle Paul to share their resources with the saints; they did not need to be “guilted” into giving. Most importantly, the Macedonians gave themselves, both to the Lord and to his saints. The Macedonians went beyond what was expected, setting an example for all Christians to follow.

    No Fear
    Andy Stanley. Stewards R Us series, no. 3. Sermon preached at North Point Community Church, Alpharetta, Ga., 1999.
    What is the primary reason that we as Christians don’t give generously? Is it that we don’t believe everything belongs to God? Is it that we don’t love God? No, Stanley says: It is because we are afraid. We somehow think that our future will become more secure by hoarding God’s resources now. We exclude God from our finances, that is, until things go wrong. But isn’t it somewhat hypocritical, Stanley asks, to ask God to protect and bless us financially when we’ve been robbing Him? 2 Corinthians 9 shows us the true path to financial security: inviting God into our finances by learning to give and to trust Him to provide. When you become a giver, “you don’t ever need to worry about running dry” because God loves to provide for those who honor Him.

    The Biblical View of Money: Part 1
    John MacArthur. The Biblical View of Money series, no. 1. Sermon preached 1997.
    This sermon on 2 Corinthians 8-9 seeks to establish a biblical perspective on giving, in order to change the prevailing attitude of guilt to one of eager participation in God’s kingdom. Author and pastor John MacArthur notes that the Macedonian Christians begged the apostle Paul to allow them the opportunity to give. They realized that blessing and riches, both spiritual and material, come as a result of generosity. Today’s culture tries to persuade us to spend our money on shortsighted projects. Yet if everything we own belongs to God, then we must give Him an account of how we spend His resources. Money is a neutral tool that can be used for either good or bad; it reveals the heart condition of the one wielding it. A love of money leads to idolatry, or a dependence upon the power of something other than God for one’s security and driving motivation.

    The Biblical View of Money: Part 2
    John MacArthur. The Biblical View of Money series, no. 2. Sermon preached 1997.
    In this sermon on 2 Corinthians 8-9, pastor and author John MacArthur examines the relationship between money and the heart. Money indicates one’s spiritual condition: When Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10) and the rich young ruler (Luke 18:18-23) were offered salvation, their level of willingness to come to Christ was reflected in their attitudes toward money. The wealthy builder in Luke 12:16-21 failed to be rich toward God though he was materially wealthy. In contrast, the poor widow at the temple (Mark 12:41-44) gave all she had. God labeled the man a fool while commending the widow as wise. Where we invest reveals where our hearts will be; the love of money leads to our trusting in money rather than in God. Since riches are deceptive and can lead to compromised convictions, we must acquire money carefully. We must gain wealth honestly, not by gambling, cheating or stealing. We must not charge interest of the needy or withhold the wages of our employees.

    The Biblical View of Money: Part 4
    John MacArthur. The Biblical View of Money series, no. 4. Sermon preached 1997.
    This sermon in speaker and author John MacArthur’s series on 2 Corinthians 8-9 continues to examine how to acquire money and how to use it. The greatest way to acquire money is through work. The second way to acquire money is through saving. Finally, we acquire money through budgeting expenses and avoiding debt. We often lack finances because of stinginess (we reap little because we sow little), hasty spending, lack of discipline, laziness, indulgence and craftiness (get-rich-quick schemes). Once we have money, we should use it to provide for our families, pay our debts, save for the future and give to God. The money we have belongs to Christ, but we have been given possessions to manage now in order to demonstrate our ability to handle heavenly treasures. Four principles help us to achieve joyful generosity: (1) The ownership of our money is transferred to God. (2) The goal and purpose of our lives is set to advance the kingdom of God. (3) Our lifestyles are free enough to respond to the Lord’s direction; in other words, we have no debt. (4) We realize that our giving will invest in eternity.

    The Grace of Giving
    Adrian Rogers. Getting on Top of Your Finances series, no. 6. Sermon, n.d.
    All giving is wrapped in grace: We give in response to Jesus’ own gift of Himself. Pastor Adrian Rogers finds that generosity exists for the purposes of magnifying Jesus and His name, for moving believers toward maturity and for making Jesus known to others in our community and world. 2 Corinthians 8:1-9:15 teaches three major points concerning grace giving: (1) The obligation of grace giving: Grace giving is not eliminated by poverty. The Macedonians had nothing yet still gave joyfully. Nor is grace giving energized by pressure from external sources, excused by performance in other areas of spiritual growth, or enforced by power from a leader. Rather, we must be motivated by love for the One who died at Calvary. (2) The operation of grace giving: Grace giving is marked by performance, in which we act out what we profess, and by providence, in which we give according to how God has blessed us. Grace giving also is managed by prudence, as we allow our gifts to be handled by men of compassion, consecration, character and competency. (3) The opportunity of grace giving: Grace giving allows us to encourage the saints, to enrich the soil of our harvest and to exalt the Savior. When we give richly because of the salvation we have received, we bring great glory to God. This resource is available on compact disc.

    The Trip to Bountiful Giving
    Charles R. Swindoll. A Minister Everyone Would Respect sermon series, no. 3. Sermon preached 1987.
    Pastor Charles Swindoll recounts what the apostle Paul’s request for money (2 Corinthians 9:1-6) and a recent experience of the march of the ducks at Memphis’ Peabody Hotel have in common: Both examples demonstrate what the four principles of group labor can accomplish. (1) Active participants must be involved. Paul could not aid the Jerusalem church without generous believers, just as the duck trainer needs ducks in order to have a parade. (2) The objectives must be clear. People must know exactly what needs to be accomplished; the ducks also need to know exactly where to walk. (3) Strong enthusiasm adds fun and momentum to the task. Participants must be willing; neither were the ducks forced along the parade route. (4) The promise of reward keeps the participants persevering. The giver anticipates a reward for generosity; the ducks also knew that food lay just behind the curtain marking the end of the parade. Indeed, the right people added to the right goals and multiplied by enough enthusiasm and direction results in accomplishment. Paul is convinced of the Corinthians’ readiness and confident of their involvement, but he exhorts them to live up to his expectations. He demonstrates his trustworthiness and ability to affirm those under his direction. Jesus performed all four principles during His earthly ministry: He became an active participant among us, followed His objective to death on the cross, lived and died without complaining and looked ahead to the reward promised beyond the cross. Swindoll exhorts us to live these principles in giving to the work of the church as we begin to actively give to ministries we can trust, with enthusiasm and with the expectation that God will honor our obedience. This sermon is available on audiocassette.

    Giving by Grace
    Charles R. Swindoll. A Minister Everyone Would Respect sermon series, no. 4. Sermon preached 1987.
    Pastor Charles Swindoll tells the story of a man who ran from God, sinking lower and lower into depravity, until he was touched by the grace that would later form the subject of one of his greatest hymns. The life of John Newton, author of Amazing Grace, demonstrates how God’s grace stoops to our level and raises us to God. Grace also softens the harshness of the law, revealing that someone else (Christ) has fulfilled its demands for us. Finally, grace becomes our guide in responding to God and others. We are able to give out of the abundance that has been first given to us. 2 Corinthians 9:6-15 teaches that bountiful sowing will result in bountiful reaping. We are to give cheerfully and purposefully, not merely reacting to external circumstances, but acting from inward resolve. Grace giving results in thanksgiving and praise to God because He has used His people to meet the needs of others. Receiving abundant grace inspires further generosity in our hearts toward others. Overall, Swindoll reminds us well of the great gift of salvation we have received in Christ and the freedom that grace provides us in order to give generously to others. This sermon is available on audiocassette.

    So It Is with Your Seed
    Rob Bell, Jr. Money series, no. 2. Sermon preached at Mars Hill Bible Church, Grandville, Mich., May 13, 2001.
    The picture Paul uses in 2 Corinthians 9 to describe giving is that of a sower, or someone who scatters seed on the ground. Rob Bell, Jr., teaching pastor at Mars Hill Bible Church in Grandville, Mich., enumerates several principles of giving that can be derived from the analogy of sowing: (1) There is a mystery to reproduction and a miracle to growth; botanists cannot explain exactly why a seed grows from a tiny entity into a massive tree. (2) A sower uses his brain; no freestyle techniques are used but, rather, those techniques that will maximize the harvest. (3) A farmer wants the biggest crop possible; he sets aside the minimum amount that his family needs for nourishment and plants the rest of his store. Contrary to the world’s understanding of wealth generation, Proverbs 11:24 states that withholding unduly brings poverty rather than riches. If we do not have anything, we might need to ask ourselves whether we have been withholding rather than sharing generously. Worry can cause us to hoard, but Matthew 6:25 commands us not to worry. God does not abandon His children but will provide for them. Our task is to seek first His kingdom; we do not need to run after the necessities of life as the pagans do. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Offering Boxes
    Rob Bell, Jr. Money series, no. 3. Sermon preached at Mars Hill Bible Church, Grandville, Mich., June 3, 2001.
    Since God owns everything already, He does not need our gifts. In the area of offerings, He is more concerned about the heart of the giver than the size of the gift. 2 Corinthians 9:5-7 teaches the principle of planned giving: We must plan our gifts prior to the assembly of worship in order that our gifts might be cheerfully offered. Yet planned giving raises the question of tithing: Is tithing, or percentage giving, the proper way to execute planned giving? The important principle to remember is that one must examine the state of the heart. For example, Jesus always discussed tithing in a negative light, not because tithing itself is wrong, but because the Pharisees were using scrupulous tithing as an excuse to neglect heart issues of justice and mercy (Matthew 23:23). If a man gives his wife a dozen roses out of obligation, she will not appreciate them. Rather, she desires the giver’s heart along with the actual gift. Similarly, God desires a cheerful giver while despising a begrudged gift. Indeed, any kind of gift must be offered in cheerfulness, whether the gift be worship, singing, prayer or finances. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    The Ministry of Giving
    George O. Wood. Sermon preached at Newport-Mesa Christian Center, Costa Mesa, Calif., n.d.
    In 2 Corinthians 8-9, the Apostle Paul describes to the church of Corinth how they should give. George O. Wood, general secretary of the Assemblies of God, looks at this passage to describe the ministry of giving. According to this sermon, (1) our true motive for giving should always be the grace of God; (2) the example of others is a legitimate inspiration for our giving; (3) our concern for excellence should include our giving; (4) giving is patterned after the example of Christ, who gave out of love; (5) we should give what we can even if it is not all we desire to give; (6) there should be equal sacrifice throughout the body of Christ; (7) we need assurance that the offerings we give will be properly accounted for and administered; (8) our enthusiasm in giving is catching; (9) those who sow bountifully will reap bountifully; and (10) our giving should result in praise being given to God. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Give is a Four Letter ‘G’ Word
    Neil Chadwick. Sermon preached at Crossroads Church, Hamburg, N.J., n.d.
    Assemblies of God pastor Neil Chadwick examines 2 Corinthians 8-9 in this sermon on giving. “ ‘Give’ is associated with God’s grace, gathering and gaining according to our true needs, and so that we may bless others. We give generously and gladly, providing whatever guarantees are necessary to produce confidence, and we seek to grow in the gift of giving so that righteousness may prevail.”

    Homily XX
    John Chrysostom. From “Saint Chrysostom: Homilies on the Epistles of Paul to the Corinthians,” vol. 12 of “A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church.” Philip Schaff, ed. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1889.
    This ancient sermon by the patriarch of Constantinople still offers much wisdom for believers today. Focusing on 2 Corinthians 9, the early Church father teaches that when we give to a person in need, we are laying sacrifices upon the altar of God and offering up to Him our thanksgiving for the abundant grace He has shown.

    A Cheerful Giver
    Bob Coy. Sermon preached at Calvary Chapel, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., May 22, 1988.
    In 2 Corinthians 8-9, Paul teaches that giving in God’s economy is not just a matter of dollar amounts and percentages. The kind of giving that pleases God is done from the heart. As he says in verse 7, “God loves a cheerful giver.” In this sermon Coy exhorts believers to bring their giving into conformity with what God teaches us in scripture about generosity. The starting point for generosity is the truth that our God is a generous God. Christ freely gave His life that we might be redeemed. In the same way, our lives should be living sacrifices for the love of God and the love of our neighbor. Coy also reminds us that we must give freely of all that we have—because all that we have ultimately belongs to God. Finally, this “grace of giving” of which Paul speaks is so important because the way in which we steward God’s possessions affects our relationship with our Creator, our fellow believers, and every other area of our lives. The Christian should not be known for his occasional acts of charity done out of a desire to be a good person. Rather, the Christian should be known for living a life of gratitude that overflows in cheerful generosity to the glory of God. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    The Proof of Love
    Ian Garrett. Sermon preached at Jesmond Parish Church, Newcastle, England, January 25, 1998.
    How do you motivate giving without being open to the criticism of manipulation? Leaders need to be above reproach when handling the church’s finances. However respectable one person may be, it is important to have several leaders keeping one another accountable in the oversight of funds: For example, the Jesmond Church has a financial committee of eight members. Following in Paul’s example (2 Corinthians 8:19-20), there needs to be not just trustworthy people handling the money but also a trustworthy structure that ensures integrity. Also essential is the question, “Is our money being spent on gospel-centered activity?” When financial promises are made, the church needs to follow through with the keeping of these promises. And, finally, the leadership should encourage the people to give not out of a response to them but, rather, as a response to God and His grace. Faithfulness in generosity is a matter of both action and attitude. This sermon examines 2 Corinthians 8:16-9:5.

    Radical Generosity
    Tim Keller. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, November 10, 1991.
    Keller delivers this message on generosity taken from 2 Corinthians 9:6-15: “There can be no significant spiritual growth unless you put your money and your attitude toward it into God's hands.” It is too big and too pivotal an issue to ignore, Keller instructs his Manhattan congregation. The mark of a real Christian is radical generosity. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Grace Abounding
    Jonathan Redfearn. Sermon preached at Jesmond Parish Church, Newcastle, England, January 25, 1998.
    In this sermon based on (2 Corinthians 9:6-15), Redfearn argues that Christians need to know the “why” as well as the “how” of giving. Christians are called to provide for the needs of God’s people, serving as partners both locally and globally in the gospel mission. Giving is an obligation, but a practice that should not be done out of reluctance but out of graciousness, for God Himself provides graciously and freely. One practical consequence of habitual giving is that “we are freed from materialism” and learn to serve rather than to be served. God promises to provide for people who share with others, as “The greater the giving, the greater the enrichment.” Giving provides a spiritual connection between the giver and receiver, and increased prayer for one another happens as a result.

    Paul’s Plan for Raising Money
    Archibald Thomas Robertson. In Classic Sermons on Stewardship. Warren W. Wiersbe, comp. The Kregel Classic Sermons Series. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications, 1999.
    Archibald Thomas Robertson (1863-1934), professor of New Testament interpretation at Southern Baptist Seminary for nearly 40 years and noted scholarly author, justifies the importance of sermons on the topic of generous giving by examining Paul’s own fund-raising message in 2 Corinthians 8-9. The apostle was not ashamed to ask the church for money, and eight particular reasons support his exhortations to give: (1) The poor Macedonians had already given in abundance (were the wealthy Corinthians going to let themselves be outdone?). (2) The Corinthians needed to fulfill their earlier pledge to help. (3) The act of giving is a concrete demonstration of love. (4) Giving generously follows the pattern of Jesus Christ, who first gave Himself for us. (5) Giving under grace should exceed the minimum amount of the tithe. (6) The Corinthians’ gifts will be managed honestly. (7) Those who sow generously will also reap generously. Finally, (8) the act of giving generously will elicit gratitude to God in the hearts of both givers and recipients. Since Paul was not afraid to preach generosity, why should the church hesitate today?

    Ten Principles of Christian Giving
    John R.W. Stott. Sermon preached at All Souls Church, Langham Place, London, September 19, 1999.
    “It is well known that the apostle Paul organized a collection from the Greek churches of Achaia and Macedonia for the benefit of the impoverished churches of Judea. It may seem extraordinary that he should have devoted so much space in his letters to this mundane matter, referring to it in Romans 15, 1 Corinthians 16, and 2 Corinthians 8-9. But Paul did not see it as a mundane matter. On the contrary he saw it as relating to the grace of God, the cross of Christ, and the unity of the Holy Spirit. In fact, it is very moving to grasp this combination of profound Trinitarian theology and practical common sense.” Noted teacher Dr. John Stott goes on to exposit 2 Corinthians 8-9, highlighting 10 important principles of giving (from the text) which provide helpful teaching on this crucial issue for the contemporary church: (1) Christian giving is an expression of the grace of God, (2) Christian giving can be a gift of the Spirit, (3) Christian giving is inspired by the cross of Christ, (4) Christian giving is proportionate giving, (5) Christian giving contributes to equality, (6) Christian giving must be carefully supervised, (7) Christian giving can be stimulated by a little friendly competition, (8) Christian giving resembles a harvest, (9) Christian giving has symbolic significance and (10) Christian giving promotes thanksgiving to God. Do you want your practice of giving to be challenged and shaped by sound biblical teaching? Understanding and applying these basic principles from Paul’s writing can help to raise our giving to another level as it grounds us in a more thoughtful, more systematic, and more sacrificial approach to generous giving. An edited version of this sermon was published as a booklet, Stott on Stewardship: Ten Principles of Christian Giving. This resource also is available on audiocassette.

    Secrets to Hilarious Giving for Special Needs
    Brian Kluth. Sermon preached at First Evangelical Free Church, Colorado Springs, Colo., September 14, 2003.
    When you think about hilarity, does being generous with your money come to mind? Pastor Brian Kluth draws five principles from 2 Corianthians 9:1-13:13 on developing an excitement for special offerings, the type of giving that goes beyond the tithe: (1) Give enthusiastically: Find the motivation. Money flows to vision, as any home remodeling project demonstrates. (2) Give preparedly: Find the means. Cash is not our only asset. The Hebrews gave their earrings for the work of God’s tabernacle. (3) Give willingly: Find the motive. Consecrate yourself to the Lord. (4) Give expectantly: Find the magnitude. As Christians we give not in order to get but, rather, because we already have been blessed. However, God does promise eternal rewards for generosity and often does bless generous givers materially. Yet the additional blessings are meant to promote even greater generosity. (5) Give obediently: Find the maturity. Generosity results in rejoicing and praise to God. This resource also is available on streaming audio.

    The Cheerful Giver: A Study of Christian Stewardship Based on 2 Corinthians 9:7
    Bob Burridge. The Genevan Institute for Reformed Studies, 1998.
    In this sermon based on 2 Corinthians 9:7, pastor Bob Burridge gives a basic overview of Christian stewardship, focusing on our spiritual obligation to give joyfully and sacrificially. Burridge gives us seven principles of biblical stewardship: (1) Contribute according to our ability. We re-evaluate what “essential” expenses are in order to give even beyond our ability. (2) Give freely, without having to be coerced. We joyfully desire to give, even beyond what is easy. (3) Give cheerfully. We give out of loving thankfulness for God’s love, not out of reluctance. (4) Give as part of a kingdom of believers. We are motivated by a desire to serve those we love, not by selfish gain. (5) Realize that we will reap what we sow. We trust God to provide for us and remember that our duty is to faithfully obey. (6) Remember that God gives satisfaction to faithful managers. We can expect true blessing by faithfully overseeing what God entrusts to us. (7) Keep in mind that giving is a form of worship and thanksgiving to God. We love because he first loved us.

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Sermons (2 Corinthians 10)
    More on this verse

    Secrets to Hilarious Giving for Special Needs
    Brian Kluth. Sermon preached at First Evangelical Free Church, Colorado Springs, Colo., September 14, 2003.
    When you think about hilarity, does being generous with your money come to mind? Pastor Brian Kluth draws five principles from 2 Corianthians 9:1-13:13 on developing an excitement for special offerings, the type of giving that goes beyond the tithe: (1) Give enthusiastically: Find the motivation. Money flows to vision, as any home remodeling project demonstrates. (2) Give preparedly: Find the means. Cash is not our only asset. The Hebrews gave their earrings for the work of God’s tabernacle. (3) Give willingly: Find the motive. Consecrate yourself to the Lord. (4) Give expectantly: Find the magnitude. As Christians we give not in order to get but, rather, because we already have been blessed. However, God does promise eternal rewards for generosity and often does bless generous givers materially. Yet the additional blessings are meant to promote even greater generosity. (5) Give obediently: Find the maturity. Generosity results in rejoicing and praise to God. This resource also is available on streaming audio.

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Sermons (2 Corinthians 11)
    More on this verse

    Secrets to Hilarious Giving for Special Needs
    Brian Kluth. Sermon preached at First Evangelical Free Church, Colorado Springs, Colo., September 14, 2003.
    When you think about hilarity, does being generous with your money come to mind? Pastor Brian Kluth draws five principles from 2 Corianthians 9:1-13:13 on developing an excitement for special offerings, the type of giving that goes beyond the tithe: (1) Give enthusiastically: Find the motivation. Money flows to vision, as any home remodeling project demonstrates. (2) Give preparedly: Find the means. Cash is not our only asset. The Hebrews gave their earrings for the work of God’s tabernacle. (3) Give willingly: Find the motive. Consecrate yourself to the Lord. (4) Give expectantly: Find the magnitude. As Christians we give not in order to get but, rather, because we already have been blessed. However, God does promise eternal rewards for generosity and often does bless generous givers materially. Yet the additional blessings are meant to promote even greater generosity. (5) Give obediently: Find the maturity. Generosity results in rejoicing and praise to God. This resource also is available on streaming audio.

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Sermons (2 Corinthians 12)
    More on this verse

    Secrets to Hilarious Giving for Special Needs
    Brian Kluth. Sermon preached at First Evangelical Free Church, Colorado Springs, Colo., September 14, 2003.
    When you think about hilarity, does being generous with your money come to mind? Pastor Brian Kluth draws five principles from 2 Corianthians 9:1-13:13 on developing an excitement for special offerings, the type of giving that goes beyond the tithe: (1) Give enthusiastically: Find the motivation. Money flows to vision, as any home remodeling project demonstrates. (2) Give preparedly: Find the means. Cash is not our only asset. The Hebrews gave their earrings for the work of God’s tabernacle. (3) Give willingly: Find the motive. Consecrate yourself to the Lord. (4) Give expectantly: Find the magnitude. As Christians we give not in order to get but, rather, because we already have been blessed. However, God does promise eternal rewards for generosity and often does bless generous givers materially. Yet the additional blessings are meant to promote even greater generosity. (5) Give obediently: Find the maturity. Generosity results in rejoicing and praise to God. This resource also is available on streaming audio.

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Sermons (2 Corinthians 13)
    More on this verse

    Secrets to Hilarious Giving for Special Needs
    Brian Kluth. Sermon preached at First Evangelical Free Church, Colorado Springs, Colo., September 14, 2003.
    When you think about hilarity, does being generous with your money come to mind? Pastor Brian Kluth draws five principles from 2 Corianthians 9:1-13:13 on developing an excitement for special offerings, the type of giving that goes beyond the tithe: (1) Give enthusiastically: Find the motivation. Money flows to vision, as any home remodeling project demonstrates. (2) Give preparedly: Find the means. Cash is not our only asset. The Hebrews gave their earrings for the work of God’s tabernacle. (3) Give willingly: Find the motive. Consecrate yourself to the Lord. (4) Give expectantly: Find the magnitude. As Christians we give not in order to get but, rather, because we already have been blessed. However, God does promise eternal rewards for generosity and often does bless generous givers materially. Yet the additional blessings are meant to promote even greater generosity. (5) Give obediently: Find the maturity. Generosity results in rejoicing and praise to God. This resource also is available on streaming audio.

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