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Stewardship Sermons (Luke)


Sermons (Luke 3)
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    Money: Its Grip Oon Us
    Andrew Chan. SermonCentral.com. Sermon preached at Richmond (B.C.) Chinese Evangelical Free Church, April 21, 2002.
    Why did Jesus speak so much about money? It is because he knew how strongly a hold money pulls has on our soulshearts, and how much changethe conversion that is needed to free our heartsus from its grip. In this sermon outline on Luke 3:7-14, pastor Andrew Chan, pastor of Richmond Chinese Evangelical Free Church, reminds us of how greatly God values us, and how he has intended giving to be a way to free our hearts for him.

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Sermons (Luke 4)
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    Blessed Are the Poor
    Paul Sartarelli. Sermon preached at The Chapel, Akron, Ohio, January 28, 2007.
    What keeps us from truly seeing poverty is not just our geography; it is also our theology. As wealthy Westerners we must remember that the currency of the kingdom of God is grace and that we can never save ourselves from spiritual poverty. If we remember our spiritual poverty apart from Christ, then we can minister to the poor with a humble and compassionate kingdom mindset. “I don’t know much about poverty,” says pastor Paul Sartarelli, preaching from Luke 4:18 and Revelation 21:1-5. “But I do know that the poor are economically and culturally what we were spiritually.” When we look at the poor, we should not see people who are somehow “inferior” to ourselves. Rather, we should see Christ, and we should see our own spiritually poor selves. Sartarelli says, “I am 2/3rds world in spirit. I am not upper-middle class in spirit. I am less than a dollar a day in spirit.” Our motivation for helping the poor should be the grace that we have received as spiritually poor people. We must take part in the Kingdom work of reversing the effects of the Fall in all ways: spiritually, relationally, socially, ecologically and economically.

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Sermons (Luke 6)
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    Blessed Are the Poor
    David Allen Marcus, Jr. Sermon preached at New Philadelphia Moravian Church, Winston-Salem, N.C., October 16, 2005.
    The Rev. David Allen Marcus, Jr. considers the meaning of Jesus’ saying that the poor are “blessed” (Luke 6). Marcus came to appreciate the true blessings of the Christians in poverty-ridden Tanzania after seeing how in their material poverty they were rich in spirit. Though the churches there are poor, they place a high value on stewardship and strive to be generous in every way. Poverty is not something to be desired in itself—and wealth can be a good thing—but we must remember that material wealth makes it hard to be “poor in spirit.” Marcus calls the Christians of our wealthy nation to consider simpler lifestyles so that we can give to those who are in need and find true joy in serving our Savior, Jesus Christ.

    Riches and Poverty
    J.C. Ryle. Sermon preached 1868.
    What does the story of the rich man dressed in purple linen, and the beggar Lazarus in Luke 6:19-23 have to say to us? Anglican bishop and theologian J.C. Ryle (1816-1900) begs us to truly listen to the message of this parable. It teaches us: (1) God allots very different conditions to different persons. (2) A person’s worldly condition is no test of the state of his soul. (2) All classes of persons eventually will come to the grave. (3) A believer’s soul is very precious in the sight of God. (4) Selfishness is a dangerous and soul-ruining sin. This passage also admonishes us to: (a) Beware of living only for ourselves. (b) Beware of the damning nature of the sins of omission. (c) Beware of the special dangers that come along with riches. And lastly, (d) take special caution about selfishness in these last days. On our own we cannot rid ourselves of the disease of selfishness; it is far too deeply rooted in our selves. “Nothing will ever cure it but a personal and intimate knowledge of Christ’s redeeming love.”

    Untitled
    George Foreman. Sermon preached at the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ, Houston, Texas, April 25, 1999.
    Preaching this brief sermon on Luke 6, former heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman teaches that giving was a central theme to Jesus’ teachings. Jesus modeled his teaching for us by feeding the hungry and healing the sick. In doing so, Jesus was showing us that the only way to live a blessed life is through giving. We have been given abundant opportunities to help people by giving of our time and money, so we should obey the Bible’s commandment to love through the act of giving.

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Sermons (Luke 8)
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    The Faith Principle
    John Meador. Treasure Principles: Jesus on Giving sermon series, no. 7. Sermon preached at Woodland Park Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., July 21, 2002.
    The final sermon in pastor John Meador’s series on Matthew 6:19-34 examines the principle of faith. This principle assures us that because we can trust God for eternity (our salvation), we also can trust Him for tomorrow (our daily bread). Life on earth is filled with uncertainty; even in America, the stock market can turn suddenly. We need to place our trust in God, storing our treasures in heavenly investments rather than hoarding wealth in earth’s precarious economy. We do not need to be anxious when we are in God’s hands. The Greek word translated as “anxious” means “to have care that brings disruption to one’s personality.” The Parable of the Sower (Luke 8:4-15) reveals the devastating effects worry can create in the life of a believer. Yet since God provides for the flowers and birds, then we can be confident that He will provide for His own children. In the past, God has been faithful numerous times. He is also in the future, knowing and exerting control over it. Though our respective situations might be difficult, God has not abandoned us. He may be stretching and growing us in faith, but He is always working in our lives. Thus, we do not need to worry about what tomorrow will bring, but simply need to walk our faith each day at a time. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

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Sermons (Luke 10)
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    Because We Love and We Care
    Rick Gillespie-Mobley. Sermon preached at Glenville New Life Community Church, Cleveland, Ohio, October 2000.
    The parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) is a fitting but often overlooked example of Christian generosity. In his life-saving ministry to a half-dead victim of brutal robbery, the Good Samaritan broke not only through social and racial barriers but also through the barrier of monetary selfishness with which we all struggle. The Good Samaritan sacrificed both time (a night and day) and money (wine, oil and two day’s wages) for the benefit of a complete stranger. Pastor Rick Gillespie-Mobley teaches that if we love God, we should be willing to make sacrifices for the kingdom. This means giving up what belongs to us in order to benefit others, following the example of the Good Samaritan. The ultimate Good Samaritan is Jesus Christ, who, though we were his enemies, gave up his life to save ours.

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Sermons (Luke 12)
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    It All Goes Back in the Box
    John Ortberg. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s annual spring conference, Irving, Texas, April 19-21, 2007.
    In this elucidative sermon, pastor and author John Ortberg explains that life is like a game of Monopoly: No matter how many dollars and hotels we accumulate, when the game is over, it all goes back in the box. Like the rich fool in Jesus’ parable (Luke 12), many of us become consumed with reaching financial goals or getting just a little bit more. We operate under the illusions of future peace and contentment when things settle down. But we forget that the game—our lives—will end. Jesus taught that people who live as though the “game” will not end are fools who forget the most important thing: being rich toward God instead of themselves. This resource is available in audio.

    Jesus on Stewardship
    Martin Wiles. Sermon preached at Union Baptist Church, Iva, S.C., September 2001.
    Based on Jesus’ parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21), this sermon concerns the location of our trust, the effects of greed and principles for good stewardship. The rich young man in the parable points us to four mistakes that the greedy make: (1) They mistake ownership of goods for possession of life. (2) They mistake wealth for security. (3) They mistake body for soul. (4) They mistake time for eternity. To avoid these mistakes, we need to follow biblical money principles: We must make service to God our highest priority; we must remember that wealth belongs to God; and we must find our security solely in God. Above all else, we must remember never to segregate our money from our service to God.

    It All Goes Back in the Box
    John Ortberg. Sermon preached at Willow Creek Community Church, Barrington, Ill., October 14-15, 2000.
    Why are we so busy and hurried all the time? In this engaging sermon, pastor John Ortberg asks us to consider seriously whether our hurry has any eternal value. “Hurry sickness” is a disease of sorts in our society which kills physically and spiritually. “Hurried is a condition of the soul. It is an inward condition where I am so frantic and preoccupied that I am unable to receive love from the Father and unable to be present with other people to give love to them.” Ortberg creatively retells a parable which speaks to us as a hurried society, Jesus’ parable of the rich fool in Luke 12. “This is the story of a man, kind of a workaholic adventure capitalist, who would be very much at home in our society.” This man was obsessed with “success,” and he gave everything to secure his financial status. What was the one thing he forgot to take into account? Death—the rich man forgot he was going to die. Ortberg compares making money and living life to playing Monopoly. When the game of life is over, “everything goes back in the box.” Everything we’ve acquired—houses and cars, titles and clothes, filled barns, bulging portfolios, even our bodies—everything goes back in the box. Since we don’t get to take anything with us when we die, we need be content with what God gives us (Philippians 4:12) and then ask ourselves: “What matters? What’s worth giving your life to?” The only good return-on-investment deal we can make is to give ourselves and our stuff to others in a way that will make eternal difference. Ortberg challenges us: “Are you living your life before God in such a way that when [death] comes you will look back on a life of wisdom? Or are you walking down a road that’s going to lead to major regret?”

    Kingdom Economics: Being Rich toward God
    Joseph M. Stowell. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s Texas regional conference, San Antonio, Texas, November 5-6, 2004.
    Luke 12 gives the account of a man who calls out to Jesus, hoping that He will instruct the man’s brother to divide an inheritance with him. Jesus responds with his most comprehensive teaching on possessions, wealth and the hunger for stuff. In this passage Jesus teaches us that the most important thing in life is to be rich toward God. In this two-part sermon, Moody Bible Institute president Joseph Stowell teaches that there are several steps in becoming rich toward God: (1) Live our lives to pursue Christ as the true satisfaction and fulfillment in our hearts. (2) Embrace contentment as the liberating option to the cancer of covetousness. (3) Get a grip on what life is not about. (4) Acknowledge God as the source of all that we have. (5) Actively pursue goodness, generosity and hospitality. (6) Draw a line at enough. In the sermon’s epilogue, Stowell continues: (7) Respond to the ramifications of immediacy. (8) Manage our wealth in the light of accountability.

    Rich toward God: Part 1
    Joseph M. Stowell. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s joint regional conference with the Christian Foundation of the Triangle, Village of Pinehurst, N.C., February 17-18, 2006.
    In the first half of a two-part message, pastor Joseph Stowell, former president of Moody Bible Institute, preaches on being rich toward God in a convicting, yet gracious way. He asks how we define wealth and then points us to the surprising way that Jesus defines wealth in Revelation 3 as being rich toward God. Stowell states that Bible has a balanced view on money, that while God gives us good things to enjoy, it is also clear about how dangerous money is to our spiritual health. One of Stowell’s clearest and most important points is drawn from Luke 12, that being rich is not in itself what the Bible condemns but, rather, that being poor toward God is the source of the sin. Stowell offers eight steps toward true prosperity: (1) Serve God alone, not money. (2) Understand that being content and generous is liberating. (3) Realize that life is not about making money for the sake of money. (4) Acknowledge God as the ultimate source of our wealth. (5) Actively pursue richness toward God. (6) Draw a line at enough and give the rest away. (7) Take action now because time is short. (8) And finally, make decisions in life knowing that we are accountable to God. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Rich toward God: Part 2
    Joseph M. Stowell. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s joint regional conference with the Christian Foundation of the Triangle, Village of Pinehurst, N.C., February 17-18, 2006.
    In the second half of a two-part message, pastor Joseph Stowell encourages us to live with our citizenship in the kingdom of heaven. Becoming rich toward God means moving our money God-ward; distribution is the key to this movement. Centering on the words of Christ in Luke 12, Stowell offers three steps to guide us toward attaining joy in distribution. (1) Embrace our new identity in Christ as followers of Jesus. When placed here, our identity is in a far safer place than it could be with money or the things of this world. (2) Deal with the inevitable anxiety; turn our fear into faith. We must trust Jesus for all that we need; if we trust him, he will never fail us. (3) Take up new residency; change our spiritual ZIP Code. This last step, placing our citizenship in the kingdom of heaven, is what Stowell emphasizes as the most important of all. He ends by offering practical ways to determine whether our citizenship is in the right place, and he exhorts us to strive for richness in good works and to exercise generosity with diligence. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Rich toward God: Part 1
    Joseph M. Stowell. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s joint regional conference with the River Foundation, Lexington, Ky., February 15-16, 2006.
    How do we define wealth? To Joseph Stowell, former president of Moody Bible Institute, a wrong view of wealth hinders many Christians from being generous givers. Using Jesus’ parable of the rich fool from Luke 12, Stowell points out to fellow believers that true wealth is not found in “deep pockets,” but rather when we “go deep with Jesus.” In the first of a two-part message, Stowell suggests seven steps that will allow us to become “rich toward God”: (1) Make “Christ our source of satisfaction.” (2) “Take heed and beware of greed.” (3) Keep an eternal perspective. (4) “Actively pursue goodness, hospitality.” (5) Don’t “hoard” possessions. (6) “Respond to the reality of immediacy.” (7) “Live a life of accountability.” Speaking with conviction and passion, Stowell leaves his listeners with a desire to give away their monetary wealth in exchange for an eternal wealth. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Rich toward God: Part 2
    Joseph M. Stowell. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s joint regional conference with the River Foundation, Lexington, Ky., February 15-16, 2006.
    “Someone ... said you can tell a lot about a person’s love and walk with Christ by reading the ledger of their checkbook.” In the second of a two-part message, Joseph Stowell, the teaching pastor of Harvest Bible Chapel in suburban Chicago, challenges his listeners to allow their giving to be a reflection of God’s generosity toward them—“overflowing” and never-ceasing. To Stowell, God’s people must follow three steps if they hope to truly reflect God’s generosity: (1) “Embrace their identity,” or recognize that we are the recipients of God’s generosity ourselves. (2) “Move from fear to faith,” or trust that God will provide for all our needs. (3) “Take up a new residency,” or embrace a kingdom perspective of our lives on earth. Using Jesus’ exhortation not to worry in Luke 12:22-34, Stowell rightly reminds us that, essentially, if our hearts are seeking the kingdom of God, our checkbooks will follow. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Money
    Timothy J. Keller. “The Meaning of Jesus: Following Him” series. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, March 9, 2003.
    Greed is a money sickness, a spiritual problem caused by money-centricity. The Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-34) and the example of the rich young ruler (Luke 18:18-30) teach us several principles concerning the money disease: (1) The need to beware of money sickness. Jesus warns against greed, not because it is more destructive than other sins, but because it is more deceptive. The fact that greed can affect our hearts without our awareness is indicated by the lack of Christians who seek help in confronting a greed problem. (2) The six signs of money sickness. A man knows he is experiencing poor money health when he gloats over his money in conspicuous consumption, worries when he doesn’t have money, views money as his security or his sense of worth, runs after money or hoards it unnecessarily. (3) The means to acquire money wellness. A Christian needs a radical experience of God’s grace. Then he will give out of gratitude because he has received God’s favor already, not because he still needs to gain that favor. Secondly, a Christian needs to be a member of a radically changed community. We are afraid to give often because we do not realize that the kingdom of God will supply our needs, as Christians mutually support one another. Overall, pastor Timothy Keller provides an excellent analysis of greed and the need for Christians to be free from its power. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Guarding against Greed
    Andy Stanley. “Exposing the Matrix” series, no. 2. Sermon preached at North Point Community Church, Alpharetta, Ga., 2000.
    In order to root out the world’s system of philosophy that subtly affects our everyday thinking, we must uncover the matrix, or origin, of those ideas. Pastor Andy Stanley discusses the matrix of greed that underlies our culture of consumerism. Greed, Stanley states, is an inordinate desire for something, particularly wealth. Introducing the sermon, a Screwtape Letters-style drama illustrates how wealth deceives us into losing sight of the next world by focusing our attention on the temporary. We fall prey to the mindset that we need just a little more in order to be happy. Stanley examines Jesus’ warning against greed, found in the Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-21). Accumulated stuff cannot extend one’s lifespan, and an obsession for things clouds our vision of eternity. A person who amasses temporal wealth but fails to be rich toward God will experience total loss. We often take care of ourselves when times are prosperous and only turn to God during trouble. Yet a Christian who places God first in his life will submit his finances to God’s direction even during the periods of plenty. Three characteristics should mark giving habits: (1) Priority: The firstfruits go to God. (2) Percentage: A specific portion is given. (3) Progression: As God prospers us, we must increase the percentage given. Stanley’s exhortation against greed is challenging and engaging. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Stop Stressing About Money, Part 1
    Francis Chan. Sermon preached at Cornerstone Community Church, Simi Valley, Calif., September 9, 2003.
    In this sermon on Luke 12:13-21, Francis Chan confronts the “respectable sin” of greed, arguing from the parable of the rich fool that we must take drastic measures against this sin, just as we would against other, less socially acceptable sins. Contentment, Chan says, is the Christian answer to the insatiable desire for wealth. Life, after all, is about knowing God, not about amassing stuff. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    How Money Defines Reality
    John Thomas. A Disciple’s Attitude toward Giving series, no. 1. Sermon preached at Church of the Redeemer, Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 2002.
    John Thomas asserts, “Money gives you a view of reality” that conflicts with the view of the world that God wants us to have. From Jesus’ parable of the rich fool in Luke 12:13-21, Thomas illustrates how money leads us to turn reality on its head. Like the rich fool, who stored up his wealth in barns, we confuse eternal, essential security with closer, this-worldly concerns. When God would have us give, we store up; when God would have us empty ourselves, we consume, and money fuels this tragic reversal. If we buy into this mistaken picture of reality, we will completely misunderstand the nature and point of giving. Giving is not, as the viewpoint of money would depict it, “just a duty that lays alongside other duties.” Instead, giving is “at the heart of every single thing a Christian is and does.” This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Money Ain’t Your Daddy
    John Thomas. A Disciple’s Attitude toward Giving series, no. 2. Sermon preached at Church of the Redeemer, Atlanta, Ga., September 15, 2002.
    In Luke 12:22-34, Jesus tells us not to worry about acquiring the basic necessities of life because “your Father knows that you need them.” Thomas’ sermon contends that when we worry about such material things or money, we try to make money into our father. We find ourselves anxious about money and the things of this world because we have replaced our true Father—God—with our concern for ourselves, which is symbolized by money. Christ calls us to recognize God’s fatherly love for us and to stop selfishly finding our security and worth in money. When we understand God as our Father, then we stop worrying about money and start giving it. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Stewardship
    George O. Wood. Sermon preached at Newport-Mesa Christian Center, Costa Mesa, Calif., n.d.
    “Stewardship” is a quaint old English word that seems to have been forgotten in today’s world. In biblical days, the term was used to describe a person who managed a wealthy person’s estate. Using this idea of the steward, Luke 12 gives us a parable of how a steward should wait in eager anticipation for his master’s return. Assemblies of God pastor George O. Wood describes the characteristics of a responsible steward and how to honor God with what He has entrusted us. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Why Jesus Called a Man a Fool
    Martin Luther King, Jr. Sermon preached at Mount Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church, Chicago, Ill., August 27, 1967. From “A Knock at Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.” Clayborne Carson and Peter Holloran, eds. New York: IPM/Warner Books, 1998.
    Preaching from Christ’s parable in Luke, Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-68)—American civil rights leader and preacher—warns against the love of money. While material things are not bad in and of themselves, King teaches, when we fail to demarcate between that which is necessary and that which we want to accumulate, we become fools in the eyes of God. Although this is only one aspect of the sermon, it is a good reminder to place our trust in God, not the things of this world.

    Loved Flock, Do Not Be Afraid to Give It Away
    John Piper. Sermon preached at Bethlehem Baptist Church, Minneapolis, Minn., May 16, 1993.
    Luke 12 is strewn with words from Jesus about not being afraid. And in every case the contentment and peace and fearlessness and courage that he wants us to have is not owing to the human resources at our disposal (like money or ability or possessions or intellect or looks or status or connections). In every case the peace and courage and fearlessness is owing to the fact that God will be there for us even when human resources are small or fail entirely. How you handle your possessions shows where your heart is. And where your heart is determines whether you are saved or not. And whether you are saved or not determines whether you will inherit the kingdom—the treasure in heaven that does not grow old. Selling your possessions and giving rather than accumulating more and more things for yourself is the pathway to the kingdom, not the payment for the kingdom. It is the proof that you love the kingdom more than possessions. That you trust the King more than money. Jesus knows that this message strikes fear into the hearts of his disciples. “When I say these things there is fear in many of you that God’s will for you might be a lifestyle very different than the one you are striving for or living in. Jesus knows that it is a fearful message.”

    Magnifying God with Money
    John Piper. Sermon preached at Bethlehem Community Church, Minneapolis, Minn., December 14, 1997.

    In this poignant exposition of Luke 12:32-34, Dr. Piper shows how our interaction with money flows out of our hearts and reflects whatever it is that we value or treasure above all else. When God is the priority object of this treasuring and valuing, our interaction with money is an avenue for worship, bringing much glory to our great God and Savior. Piper shows that Jesus commands us not to be afraid or anxious about money. He points out that when we acknowledge God’s ownership of our possessions, we proclaim to the world and to ourselves that Jesus is our Shepherd, our Father and our King. Remembering that God is our generous benefactor and that it makes Him happy to give us His kingdom helps us as we fight the daily battles of resisting worldly and sinful attitudes and behavior toward material things. Out of these truths about God, says Piper, flows an impulse toward simplification instead of accumulation. Using other passages from Luke and Acts, Piper shows that while the Bible doesn’t set a limit on how much money we earn, it does stress the need to limit what we keep, as seen in Jesus’ repeated emphasis on selling all our possessions. Like weeds in a garden, possessions will always choke out the word of the gospel unless God intervenes. Since Jesus spoke more of money than any other temptation (even sex), we should give close and regular attention to the role it plays in what we worship. This sermon is a helpful teaching from Scripture to help us discern whether we are making much of God or much of money in our daily lives. This resource also is available on audiocassette; compact disc.

    Jesus the Revolutionary: Implications for Christ-Centered Stewardship
    Joseph Stowell. Sermon preached at the annual Generous Giving Conference, Phoenix, Ariz., March 1-3, 2001.

    Living in the world’s wealthiest nation, the concept of success is not foreign to Americans. Yet what is God’s definition of success? According to the president of Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, true success is taught to us through the words and life of Christ. By examining the gospels, we learn that the secret to success is threefold: (1) If we want to be successful in the eyes of God, we must first answer Christ’s call for our lives. (2) Because of what God has given us, He holds us accountable for how we use our success. As part of God’s kingdom, we need to store our treasures in heaven, for “a man’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions” (Luke 12:15). (3) Even amidst success, we must realize that we are not self-sufficient; we need a relationship with our Lord. When it comes down to the essentials, Stowell argues, God doesn’t want our money; He wants our grateful obedience. Out of the abundance of a relationship with Him, generosity will follow.

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Sermons (Luke 16)
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    God’s Kingdom, Our Stuff
    Andy Stanley. Sermon preached at North Point Community Church, Alpharetta, Ga., 1997.
    Stuff is funny, isn’t it? We acquire lots of stuff, because we think that it will “serve” us well. But in fact, we spend an absurd amount of time and money moving, storing, protecting, and insuring our stuff—serving it! In this two-part sermon, Andy Stanley preaches Jesus’ command to seek God’s kingdom, and not to worry about stuff. What I do with my stuff, it turns out, has a lot to do with my own future in God’s kingdom. Stanley exhorts us to use our possessions as tools for the kingdom. By investing in heaven, we will not be disappointed. Part 1, taken from Luke 16:1-13, pertains to the parable of the shrewd manager. Part 2, taken from Matthew 6:19-24, examines storing treasure in heaven. This resource is available on audiocassette; compact disc.

    Faithful Stewardship
    Adrian Rogers. Getting on Top of Your Finances series, no. 7. Sermon, n.d.
    The Parable of the Shrewd Manager (Luke 16:1-15) appears at first to be about a crook commended for dishonesty. While the master did not actually commend his servant’s unrighteousness, he nevertheless recognized the steward’s wisdom in preparing for the future. Since we, too, are stewards of God’s resources, He is interested in how we manage His affairs. To avoid serving money as a substitute master, pastor Adrian Rogers encourages us to ask ourselves whom we trust for security, whom we prioritize in financial decisions and whom we admire in our hearts. Faithful stewardship covers several financial areas: (1) Securing money: We must obtain wealth by working with diligence in a legitimate, God-honoring business. (2) Saving money: We must prepare for the future but avoid hoarding wealth for its own sake. (3) Spending money: Our attitudes, not our circumstances, determine wise spending choices. We may have to reduce lifestyle in order to stay out of debt. (4) Sharing money: Many Christians complain about tithing, but can we let a Jew under law out-give us who are under grace? In heaven we will find people who were impacted through our generosity. Sharing now will have eternal rewards. This resource is available on compact disc.

    The Principle of Accountability
    Darryl Craft. Can You Be Trusted? series, no. 1. Sermon preached at Brainerd Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., February 2, 2003.
    In the first sermon of his four-part series on principles of stewardship, pastor Darryl Craft examines the principle of accountability. Christian stewardship is the acknowledgement of God’s ownership and our management of His property. The Parable of the Shrewd Manager (Luke 16:1-15) teaches that a steward will be asked to give an account of his management practices. In order to be faithful managers, we first must discover what our duties are: (1) Managers must make an examination of available resources. The steward in the parable was not paying attention to his Master’s goods, but we can consider wisely what we have to give. (2) Managers must make an evaluation of the resources in the world. We must ask where our money is going. (3) Managers continually must make decisions about the use of the Master’s resources. A budget helps a steward to set and follow financial priorities. Although reorganizing our financial practices in order to more faithfully manage God’s money may be difficult, we will find ourselves delving deeper into the depths of God when we do so. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    The Principle of Opportunity
    Darryl Craft. Can You Be Trusted? series, no. 2. Sermon preached at Brainerd Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., February 9, 2003.
    In the second sermon of his four-part series on principles of stewardship, pastor Darryl Craft turns to Luke 16:3-9 to develops the principle of opportunity. The word “opportunity” is derived from the Latin word used to describe the tide needed to enter a port. A tide flows in the correct direction only at specific times and needs to be utilized during those limited durations. In order to be wise stewards, we need to recognize and take God-given opportunities to maximize His wealth. The steward in Jesus’ Parable of the Shrewd Manager (Luke 16:1-15) maximized his own resources in four ways that we can follow in order to increase God’s riches: (1) He planned for the future. (2) He worked out his plan. (3) He saved. (4) He invested. Though Jesus did not commend the steward for his roguery, He did commend the man for his resourcefulness. God also commends those who practice prudence in handling His affairs and who view material wealth as an opportunity to invest in the eternal future. We have the means to start investing in His kingdom today; let us seize the opportunity while we have it. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    The Principle of Being Trustworthy
    Darryl Craft. Can You Be Trusted? series, no. 3. Sermon preached at Brainerd Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., February 16, 2003.
    In the third sermon of his four-part series on principles of stewardship, pastor Darryl Craft investigates the relationship Jesus drew between earthly wealth and spiritual riches. In His Parable of the Shrewd Manager (Luke 16:1-15), Jesus links the two forms of wealth in four ways: (1) The connection: Faithfulness in little actions, such as managing earthly resources, leads to faithfulness in great actions, such as handling spiritual wealth. (2) The comparison: We first must decide which resource, the temporal or the eternal, is truly valuable to us and then orient our financial decisions toward achieving that goal. (3) The clarification: Earthly wealth is given as a trust for us to manage, but spiritual wealth is given us to own. (4) The confrontation: Since no one can serve two masters, we must examine our personal lives and determine whom we shall follow. Since the wise management of earthly resources leads to a wealth that will never fade, Craft urges us to pursue heavenly riches with wholehearted devotion. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    The Principle of Honesty
    Darryl Craft. Can You Be Trusted? series, no. 4. Sermon preached at Brainerd Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., February 23, 2003.
    In the final sermon of his four-part series on principles of stewardship, pastor Darryl Craft uses the Pharisees as a negative example of the principle of honesty. After Jesus narrated the Parable of the Shrewd Manager (Luke 16:1-15), the Pharisees mocked His teaching. Jesus recognized and condemned their dishonest attempts to look religious even as they failed to be good stewards. Craft offers two indicators of spiritual dishonesty: when a person’s life is a contradiction to the truth and when a person is in contempt of the truth. In contrast, the spiritually honest person exhibits three characteristics: (1) He has the right Master. (2) He has the right motive. (3) He has the right measure, using God’s standards of righteousness rather than man’s. Craft calls us to examine our hearts in order to avoid living for religious show rather than for God. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Money Matters
    Robert Johnson. Money Matters series, no. 1. Sermon preached at Hixson (Tenn.) Presbyterian Church, November 5, 2000.
    Robert Johnson notes that the title of this series reveals two aspects about to be discussed: the importance of money and the issues that surround it. When Jesus states that one cannot serve both God and Mammon (wealth, possessions and anything that money can buy), He personifies the latter as a rival master. Jesus recognized man’s tendency to place his trust in riches, to hope in wealth and to lust after it. Yet Jesus gives several reasons in the Parable of the Shrewd Manager (Luke 16:1-15) on why we must choose to serve God instead: (1) God alone is owner of all. We are simply servants and stewards; whatever we have is possessed by grace. Because God gives freely to us, we must use the master’s money in order to be kind and generous toward others. (2) Choosing God over money matters to our spiritual health. Handling earthly riches is preparation for the management of heavenly wealth. (3) Our tendency is toward idolatry; we must be continually on guard against it. Though a Christian may never actually say that he is serving Mammon, often we act as if Mammon were our true master. Signs that indicate a possible devotion to Mammon rather than to God include the times when we treat money as our first priority, when we become undisciplined in spending habits and when we begin to value things over people. Overall, Johnson provides an excellent exhortation to keep our heart attitudes in the correct place. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Financial Decisions with Eternal Consequences
    Francis Chan. Sermon preached at Cornerstone Community Church, Simi Valley, Calif., April 4, 2004.
    In this sermon on Luke 16:1-15 (the parable of the shrewd manager), Francis Chan addresses the relation between present financial decisions and eternal consequences. Many pastors, he admits, avoid this passage because of its interpretive difficulties. But Chan insists that its message is imperative for Christians who would use their money wisely. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    First Sermon on Lazarus and the Rich Man
    John Chrysostom. In On Wealth and Poverty. Translated and introduced by Catharine P. Roth. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1984.
    In this sermon preached from Luke 16, early Church father John Chrysostom (ca. 350-407) enumerates the many dangers of riches and warns Christians to beware of the corrupting influence of wealth. From the rich man in this parable, we can learn that our spiritual well-being is far more important than our physical comfort. It is far better to suffer in this life and receive eternal glory than to suffer eternal torment in hell after living a lavish life of sin that neglects the care of the poor and sick. Often, Chrysostom points out, God uses the suffering in this life to refine and sanctify us as we must look to Him for strength and grace.

    Second Sermon on Lazarus and the Rich Man
    John Chrysostom. On Wealth and Poverty. Translated and introduced by Catharine P. Roth. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1984.
    Who is poor and who is rich? Although we are conditioned to equate those who have amassed great material wealth with “the rich,” early Church father John Chrysostom (ca. 350-407) challenges the common definition in this sermon on Luke 16, based on the parable of the rich man and Lazarus. “If we are to tell the truth, the rich man is not the one who has collected many possessions but the one who needs few possessions,” and the poor man is he who is consumed by greed and will never be satisfied. Death reveals the true status of wealth. The rich man’s fault did not lie in his wealth, Chrysostom points out, but rather in his neglect to act as a steward and share his wealth with those in need.

    Seventh Sermon on Lazarus and the Rich Man
    John Chrysostom. On Wealth and Poverty. Translated and introduced by Catharine P. Roth. Crestwood, N.Y.: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1984.
    The final sermon in a series concerning wealth and poverty based on Luke 16, this sermon by early Church father John Chrysostom (ca. 350-407) challenges believers to “enter through the narrow gate,” realizing that the struggles in this life are for our future glory. Although material wealth now may appear to secure happiness and prosperity, often true joy comes from learning to depend on God through the challenges He presents us.

    Biblical Christian Stewardship
    J. Ligon Duncan. Sermon preached at First Presbyterian Church of Jackson, Miss., November 1999.
    Christian stewardship is about all the resources that we have; it is about all of life. Christians live with the understanding that all that we are and have comes from—and belongs to—the Lord. Jesus is the Lord and owner and source of all things. In the parable of the dishonest business manager (Luke 16:1-13), Jesus seeks to challenge his disciples in their view of God, their view of wealth, and their view of their own stewardship. The Pharisees were so concerned with their wealth and place on this earth that they forgot how to use their worldly possessions wisely. Jesus seeks to show that even dishonest worldly people can manage their money wisely. How much more wisely should Christians manage their money? We can take five things from this passage: (1) Christian stewards use their means for spiritual ends. (2) Faithfulness in little things results in faithfulness in big things. (3) Our use of wealth is a spiritual indicator. (4) Christian stewards realize that everything they have comes from and belongs to God. (5) Christian stewards deliberately choose God over wealth.

    Money: Bad Master, Good Servant
    Bob Coy. Sermon preached at Calvary Chapel, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., November 27, 1991.
    In the parable of the shrewd manager (Luke 16:1-12), the rich master brings his servant to account for mismanagement of household funds. Like the manager, Christians, too, will be brought to account for the way in which they handle God’s resources. These resources include the areas of material wealth, time, gifts and talents, and the gospel itself. Even though the manager sets a bad example in honesty, Christians still can emulate his response to his situation: The manager was enthusiastic, energetic and proactive in accomplishing his goal. He invested in his future, making friends and preparing wisely for the time when he would no longer be safe in the master’s house. Christians, confident that their investments will pay off in heaven, also should use the present time to prepare for the future. Faithfulness in the smaller earthly matters prepares us to be faithful in the larger heavenly tasks. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    Stewardship
    Charles G. Finney. From “Sermons on Important Subjects.” New York: John S. Taylor, 1836.
    Ministering in the wake of the Second Great Awakening, Charles G. Finney (1792-1875) became the father of the revivalist movement. In this sermon on Luke 16:2, Finney challenges believers to live like stewards of God, not as owners of what He has entrusted to us. “God will soon call you to give an account of your stewardship,” he preaches. “Have you been faithful to God, faithful to your own soul, and the souls of others? Are you ready to have your accounts examined, your conduct scrutinized, and your life weighed in the balance of the sanctuary? Are you interested in the blood of Jesus Christ?”

    The Joy of Giving
    Greg Laurie. Sermon preached on “A New Beginning” daily radio broadcast, March 3-4, 2003.
    If we belong to Christ, we are not our own. Yet we may get in the habit of thinking MY job, MY car, MY house. But when we give our lives to Christ, we are to give Him our all. Laurie teaches from Christ’s parable in Luke 16 that since the Lord owns everything, we must be good stewards of those things He has entrusted to our care. The Christian will never regret any of the money or resources we invest in God’s kingdom. Honor God with our money and experience the joy of giving! This resource is available on streaming audio (part 1, part 2).

    Stewardship
    Henry Parry Liddon. In Classic Sermons on Stewardship. Warren W. Wiersbe, comp. The Kregel Classic Sermons Series. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications, 1999.
    Anglican minister Henry Parry Liddon (1829-90), preaching from the parable of the shrewd manager in Luke 16, reminds us that each one of us will be called to give an account to God Himself for how we have lived on this earth as His stewards. Liddon defines a steward as one responsible for something that belongs to another. The Bible teaches us that our possessions ultimately belong to God and that He has given us the task of caring for what belongs to Him. It is imperative that we realize that we are stewards of every aspect of life, not just our money. We will be called to account not only for how we have used our wealth but also for how we have used our bodies, intellects, time, talents, etc. Therefore, every moment of our lives should be marked by a deep concern to live as those who will be called to give an account before God, to whom everything belongs.

    Sermon for the Ninth Sunday after Trinity; Luke 16:1-9
    Martin Luther. Sermon from “The Church Postils.” In “The Precious and Sacred Writings of Martin Luther,” vol. 13., trans. and ed. John Nicholas Lenker. Minneapolis: Lutherans in All Lands, 1904; reprinted as “Sermons on Gospel Texts for the 1st to the 12th Sundays after Trinity,” vol. 4 of “The Sermons of Martin Luther: The Church Postils.” Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Book House, 1983.
    In this sermon on the parable of the unjust steward, Martin Luther (1483-1546), a man known for his emphasis on faith over works during the Protestant Reformation, teaches that works do have a place in the Christian life. Our works and our giving should come out of a changed heart in Christ. Here, Luther extols fellow believers to give of the abundance God has blessed them with, for to withhold it is to rob their Lord.

    Money in Heaven
    Charles S. Price. The Golden Grain 10, no. 1 (April 1935).
    The English-born minister Dr. Charles S. Price (1887-1947) tries to clarify the difficult text in Luke 16:9, which exhorts believers to follow the example of the shrewd manager. This steward dishonestly used the funds entrusted to his care to win friends for himself in the outside world. Why did Christ choose such a less-than-exemplary character for His followers to emulate? First, Christ chose a character who illustrated the type of people He came to save—the sinful and lost. Yet even more importantly, Christ demonstrates the eternal repercussions of earthly financial transactions. The way in which we spend our money now does affect our eternal condition. Though prudent financial management here does not save us, obedient stewardship is the result of the faith we receive by grace. Only those works which reflect obedience to God will survive eternally; all others will be destroyed. Thus, Christians would do well to imitate the shrewd manager’s example of living now in preparation for the future.

    The Unjust Steward: Learning from the Unbeliever
    John Skaggs. Sermon preached at Sovereign Grace Baptist Church, Claypool, Ariz., May, 24, 1998.
    John Skaggs, founding pastor of Sovereign Grace Baptist Church in Claypool, Ariz., delivers this sermon on stewardship taken from Luke 16:1-13.

    God’s Kingdom, Our Stuff
    Andy Stanley. Sermon series preached at North Point Community Church, Alpharetta, Ga., 1997.
    Stuff is funny, isn’t it? We acquire lots of stuff, because we think that it will “serve” us well. But in fact, we spend an absurd amount of time and money moving, storing, protecting, and insuring our stuff—serving it! In this short two-part series, Andy Stanley preaches Jesus’ command to seek God’s kingdom, and not to worry about stuff. What I do with my stuff, it turns out, has a lot to do with my own future in God’s kingdom. Message 1, taken from Luke 16:1-13, pertains to the parable of the shrewd manager. Message 2, taken from Matthew 6:19-24, examines storing treasure in heaven. This resource is available on
    audiocassette; compact disc.

    The Parable
    Andy Stanley. Stewards R Us series, no. 2. Sermon preached at North Point Community Church, Alpharetta, Ga., 1999.
    In many ways, the parable of the shrewd money manager (Luke 16) is a strange story. Here is a man who’s to be laid off for misusing his master’s money, but in the end he is commended for using his limited time and limited money to gain friends for the future. It’s a strange story, but we don’t have to puzzle over its meaning. Jesus interpreted it plainly: “Use worldly wealth to gain friends for yourselves, so that when it is gone, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings” (v. 9). The point? Temporary, inanimate stuff can have eternal consequence when it’s invested in the kingdom. Andy Stanley summarizes it this way: Money is a tool of great value, a test of our priorities, and a trademark of who we are.

    The Use of Money
    John Wesley. Sermon 50.
    John Wesley (1703-91) consorted mostly with people who worked hard, owned little, and could never be certain of their financial future. But he preached so widely and became so well-known that his income eventually reached £1,400 per year—equivalent to more than $160,000 today. Still, he chose to live simply but comfortably on just £30 while giving the rest away. This is the context for his curious sermon on Luke 16:9.

    The Good Steward
    John Wesley. Sermon 51. Edinburgh, Scotland, May 14, 1768.
    In this sermon, based on Luke 16:2, the great evangelist develops four points: (1) In what respects are we now God’s stewards? (2) When he requires our souls of us, we “can be no longer stewards,” (3) We will need to “give an account of our stewardship,” and (4) There is no employment of our time, no action or conversation, that is purely indifferent and we can never do more than our duty.

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Sermons (Luke 18)
    More on this verse

    Would Jesus Drive a BMW?
    Michael Treston. Sermon preached August 2000.
    This short message directed toward teenagers focuses on how the story of Jesus’ encounter with the rich young ruler (Luke 18:18-30) applies today. This story reveals an important distinction concerning wealth: It is not the riches themselves that harm our relationship with God but what we do with them. Nonetheless, money is a dangerous thing, and we need to be cautious to keep it from ruling over us. If we want God “full on,” we need to invite him into our wallets as well as our hearts.

    Kingdom Economics: The Rich Young Ruler
    Joseph M. Stowell. Sermon preached at Generous Giving’s Texas regional conference, San Antonio, Texas, November 5-6, 2004.
    Jesus talked about money more than He did any other single thing. Why is He so concerned with this subject? Because wealth is the number-one block to our understanding how much we need Him, and wealth diminishes our trust in God. Moody Bible Institute president Joseph Stowell summarizes the kingdom economy in five laws: (1) The kingdom economy is freedom from anxiety. (2) The kingdom economy is supply-side: It says, “Give, and you will get.” (3) Our net worth is secured in the kingdom economy. (4) Liquidate for leverage. (5) When we are investing in the kingdom economy, we will find our hearts in a healthy place. Stowell closes his message with the story of the rich young ruler in Luke 18. Here Jesus tells us that He wants our undiminished and non-negotiated love and loyalty. He wants us to give up whatever holds us back and encumbers us from following Him.

    Money
    Timothy J. Keller. “The Meaning of Jesus: Following Him” series. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, March 9, 2003.
    Greed is a money sickness, a spiritual problem caused by money-centricity. The Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-34) and the example of the rich young ruler (Luke 18:18-30) teach us several principles concerning the money disease: (1) The need to beware of money sickness. Jesus warns against greed, not because it is more destructive than other sins, but because it is more deceptive. The fact that greed can affect our hearts without our awareness is indicated by the lack of Christians who seek help in confronting a greed problem. (2) The six signs of money sickness. A man knows he is experiencing poor money health when he gloats over his money in conspicuous consumption, worries when he doesn’t have money, views money as his security or his sense of worth, runs after money or hoards it unnecessarily. (3) The means to acquire money wellness. A Christian needs a radical experience of God’s grace. Then he will give out of gratitude because he has received God’s favor already, not because he still needs to gain that favor. Secondly, a Christian needs to be a member of a radically changed community. We are afraid to give often because we do not realize that the kingdom of God will supply our needs, as Christians mutually support one another. Overall, pastor Timothy Keller provides an excellent analysis of greed and the need for Christians to be free from its power. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

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Sermons (Luke 19)
    More on this verse

    Two Men with Money
    Timothy J. Keller. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, October 21, 2001.
    The accounts of Namaan the leper (2 Kings 5:13-19) and Zacchaeus the tax collector (Luke 19:5-10) both relate the stories of a wealthy man’s transformational encounter with the gospel. These stories demonstrate two obstacles that can prevent acceptance of the gospel. Namaan’s barrier was pride in his ability and status. Yet Elisha’s instructions to Namaan revealed the leveling nature of God’s grace: Since anyone could wash himself in a river, God essentially told Namaan that no difference between the powerful and the lowly existed in His eyes. Everyone was destitute before Him and in need of His gracious salvation. Namaan, being a high official, had expected a noble task that none but a powerful man could achieve. He almost declined cleansing because of the humiliation of acknowledging that he could do nothing more to deserve his salvation than could a pauper. Zacchaeus’ obstacle was the exclusionism of the self-righteous crowds. Yet Jesus reached out to him anyway and entered his heart. Both Namaan and Zacchaeus’ conversions resulted in joyful generosity and the desire to transform their pre-conversion professions through gospel living. Yet each man developed his own creative strategy for the practical application of those principles. Pastor Timothy Keller encourages others to follow these two biblical examples: First, encounter the gospel; then develop a creative and personalized giving strategy based on an enthusiastic and grateful response to all that Christ has done. Note: No downloadable text or audio is available at this time.

    Breaking through the Obstacles to Life
    Billy Graham. Sermon preached at the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky Billy Graham Mission, Cincinnati, Ohio, June 28, 2002; reprint, Decision, August 2002.
    “Many people think that money is the answer to all of their problems, but there are limitations to what money can do,” says evangelist Billy Graham. “Money will buy a bed but not a night’s sleep. It will buy books but not brains. It’ll buy food but not an appetite. It’ll buy finery but not beauty; a house but not a home; medicine but not health; luxuries but not culture; amusements but not happiness; religion but not salvation.” In this sermon delivered before thousands, Graham uses the story of Zacchaeus from Luke 19:1-10 to discuss obstacles—like money—that get in the way of people coming to Christ.

    Two Men with Money
    Tim Keller. Sermon preached at Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York, February 27, 2000.
    The preacher looks at the stories of Naaman and Zacchaeus, two rich men who realized their wealth could not make them “insiders” with God. We all have the sense that we are not “in,” that we are missing something, he teaches. According to Keller, “money has a power because it promises to give you what it can’t, and that is to heal this general deep-down sense that somehow I’m an outsider.” While money falls short of fulfilling this need, he explains, the grace of God is sufficient. This resource is available on streaming audio.

    The Rewards of the Trading Servants
    Alexander Maclaren. In Classic Sermons on Stewardship. Warren W. Wiersbe, comp. The Kregel Classic Sermons Series. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications, 1999.
    Alexander Maclaren (1826-1910), the great expository preacher and pastor of Union Chapel, Manchester, finds in Luke 19:17-19 a hierarchy of reward in the new kingdom based upon stewardship faithfulness on earth. Both servants in the the Parable of the Pounds (or Minas) received the same capital to invest, but one was more diligent than the other and received a greater reward upon the master’s return. Similarly, our lives here are but preparation for continued work in heaven; thus, our faithful working in the present will determine how fit we are for service in the future. Too often, the emphasis on the undeserved character of saving faith overshadows the important rewards of faithful living. Certainly, the second is not possible without the first; but such dependence does not negate our responsibility to be faithful stewards. We must prepare now for future heavenly service.

    Jesus Takes the ‘Stew’ out of Stewardship
    Earle Vaydor Pierce. In Classic Sermons on Stewardship. Warren W. Wiersbe, comp. The Kregel Classic Sermons Series. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications, 1999.
    In this sermon, Earle Vaydor Pierce (1869-?), a pastor in the former Northern Baptist Convention, shows us that good stewardship is a joy and a blessing, rather than something we should “stew” about. Preaching from the parallel passages of Matthew 25:14-30 and Luke 19:11-27, Pierce shows us that the servants who were faithful with their master’s possessions while he was away reaped a double harvest: They enriched their master who, in turn, enriched them. In the same way, we should seek to be faithful stewards of all that God has entrusted to us until Christ returns in glory. Becoming faithful stewards requires that we acknowledge Christ as Lord and ourselves as His bondservants, to abandon the attitude that life in the service of another is not worth it, and to realize that all of our lives, including our money, are to be invested with the aim of enriching our Master, the Lord Jesus. As Jesus’ parables make clear, Pierce preaches that the God whose kingdom we seek to build in this life will pour out His riches on us in heaven.

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Sermons (Luke 21)
    More on this verse

    I Dare You
    John Beehler. Sermon preached at Bethel Presbyterian, Union Mills, Ind., August 2000.
    Lay pastor John Beehler preaches from the story of the widow’s mite (Luke 21:1-4) to remind us what Jesus is looking for in our giving. First, the widow gave sacrificially; although she gave only a fraction monetarily of what others were contributing, she gave away all of her living—in essence, she gave her very life into the temple treasury. Of course, she would not have done this apart from a deep trust in God and his provision for her every need. Jesus is still standing by the treasury box of the church, waiting for us to place our trust in him by giving sacrificially to his kingdom.

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